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  • 19 Apr 2017
    The Pony Express operated for only the 19 months between April 1860 and October 1861, but its story remains an important part of Western lore. And as we saw in our previous 2 shows on Oregon Trail collectibles, we'll find that there are quite a number of interesting antiques associated with the Pony Express. There are the Pony Express Bibles, postmarked letters, broadsides announcing the service, mochilas, commemorative stamps, the small saddles, and then there are the Depression era WPA murals that were done in post offices along the route (which followed the Oregon Trail to Fort Bridger, then the Mormon Trail to Salt Lake, then across Nevada and over the Sierra Nevadas to Sacramento). Hope you can tune in this coming Sunday evening, April 24, 2017, for this week's program on Pony Express Collectibles. We'll be on at the usual time: 5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT. Gary
    23 Posted by Gary & Carol Stover
  • The Pony Express operated for only the 19 months between April 1860 and October 1861, but its story remains an important part of Western lore. And as we saw in our previous 2 shows on Oregon Trail collectibles, we'll find that there are quite a number of interesting antiques associated with the Pony Express. There are the Pony Express Bibles, postmarked letters, broadsides announcing the service, mochilas, commemorative stamps, the small saddles, and then there are the Depression era WPA murals that were done in post offices along the route (which followed the Oregon Trail to Fort Bridger, then the Mormon Trail to Salt Lake, then across Nevada and over the Sierra Nevadas to Sacramento). Hope you can tune in this coming Sunday evening, April 24, 2017, for this week's program on Pony Express Collectibles. We'll be on at the usual time: 5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT. Gary
    Apr 19, 2017 23
  • 19 Apr 2017
    The Pony Express operated for only the 19 months between April 1860 and October 1861, but its story remains an important part of Western lore. And as we saw in our previous 2 shows on Oregon Trail collectibles, we'll find that there are quite a number of interesting antiques associated with the Pony Express. There are the Pony Express Bibles, postmarked letters, broadsides announcing the service, mochilas, commemorative stamps, the small saddles, and then there are the Depression era WPA murals that were done in post offices along the route (which followed the Oregon Trail to Fort Bridger, then the Mormon Trail to Salt Lake, then across Nevada and over the Sierra Nevadas to Sacramento). Hope you can tune in this coming Sunday evening, April 24, 2017, for this week's program on Pony Express Collectibles. We'll be on at the usual time: 5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT. Gary
    18 Posted by Gary & Carol Stover
  • The Pony Express operated for only the 19 months between April 1860 and October 1861, but its story remains an important part of Western lore. And as we saw in our previous 2 shows on Oregon Trail collectibles, we'll find that there are quite a number of interesting antiques associated with the Pony Express. There are the Pony Express Bibles, postmarked letters, broadsides announcing the service, mochilas, commemorative stamps, the small saddles, and then there are the Depression era WPA murals that were done in post offices along the route (which followed the Oregon Trail to Fort Bridger, then the Mormon Trail to Salt Lake, then across Nevada and over the Sierra Nevadas to Sacramento). Hope you can tune in this coming Sunday evening, April 24, 2017, for this week's program on Pony Express Collectibles. We'll be on at the usual time: 5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT. Gary
    Apr 19, 2017 18
  • 13 Apr 2017
    Please join us this Sunday at 5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT for the second part of our program on Oregon Trail Collectibles, and if you missed Part I last week, check it out in the Videos before this week's show. Gary
    64 Posted by Gary & Carol Stover
  • Please join us this Sunday at 5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT for the second part of our program on Oregon Trail Collectibles, and if you missed Part I last week, check it out in the Videos before this week's show. Gary
    Apr 13, 2017 64
  • 08 Apr 2017
    One of the benefits of being a dealer at The Brass Armadillo is having the opportunity to learn about so many things ranging from just plain old “stuff”, to antique furniture, to glassware, and on and on. Everyone is aware of reproductions; “Repros “or “Fakes” are made to be sold by unscrupulous persons as original items. But I never thought about “authorized” reproductions until this past week when I met Dirck Schou, CEO of H. F. Coors/Catalina China pottery in Tucson, Arizona. H. F. Coors (yes founded by the son of the Coors Brewery founder, Adolf Coors) is the only authorized manufacturer of the legendary Mimbreno dinnerware which was used exclusively on the Santé Fe Railroad Dining cars. Original Mimbreno was made from 1936 to 1970. I’ll be writing about Mimbreno in a later blog. Hearing about the Mimbreno authorized reproductions led me to learn more about “authorized” reproductions. In order to obtain legal rights to reproduce an item, a manufacturer has to obtain permission from the holder or heirs to the original owner of the trademark or patent of the item. This process can be expensive and quite a lengthy period of time before the reproduced item can be made. Thus authorized reproductions are often somewhat expensive, but usually not nearly as expensive, or as scarce, as the originals. Therefore, we can possess and enjoy the beauty of an antique without have to break the bank to purchase it.  
    92 Posted by Betty Jean Shearin
  • One of the benefits of being a dealer at The Brass Armadillo is having the opportunity to learn about so many things ranging from just plain old “stuff”, to antique furniture, to glassware, and on and on. Everyone is aware of reproductions; “Repros “or “Fakes” are made to be sold by unscrupulous persons as original items. But I never thought about “authorized” reproductions until this past week when I met Dirck Schou, CEO of H. F. Coors/Catalina China pottery in Tucson, Arizona. H. F. Coors (yes founded by the son of the Coors Brewery founder, Adolf Coors) is the only authorized manufacturer of the legendary Mimbreno dinnerware which was used exclusively on the Santé Fe Railroad Dining cars. Original Mimbreno was made from 1936 to 1970. I’ll be writing about Mimbreno in a later blog. Hearing about the Mimbreno authorized reproductions led me to learn more about “authorized” reproductions. In order to obtain legal rights to reproduce an item, a manufacturer has to obtain permission from the holder or heirs to the original owner of the trademark or patent of the item. This process can be expensive and quite a lengthy period of time before the reproduced item can be made. Thus authorized reproductions are often somewhat expensive, but usually not nearly as expensive, or as scarce, as the originals. Therefore, we can possess and enjoy the beauty of an antique without have to break the bank to purchase it.  
    Apr 08, 2017 92
  • 05 Apr 2017
    The Oregon Trail was our way west to Oregon & California from the 1830s til the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad in 1869, and that's a period full of stories and objects associated with those stories. And some of those objects  are out there to collect, and they often have quite uncredible stories to tell. So, for the next 2 weeks I've selected some very interesting pieces relating to the Oregon Trail to profile in our shows. There's an Alfred Jacob Miller oil painting of a Native American on horseback c. 1838; there are maps from the 1840s; first hand accounts of the journey in the form of books and magazine articles; newspaper articles from Sacramento and San Francisco of the 1849 gold rush; photographs taken with a "mammoth camera" of Yosemite and the Willamette Valley by Carleton Watkins. So many things, in fact, that we've had to spread the program over 2 parts. Part I airs Sunday, April 9, 2017, at 5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT. Part II will follow next Sunday. Hope you can join us. Gary
    102 Posted by Gary & Carol Stover
  • The Oregon Trail was our way west to Oregon & California from the 1830s til the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad in 1869, and that's a period full of stories and objects associated with those stories. And some of those objects  are out there to collect, and they often have quite uncredible stories to tell. So, for the next 2 weeks I've selected some very interesting pieces relating to the Oregon Trail to profile in our shows. There's an Alfred Jacob Miller oil painting of a Native American on horseback c. 1838; there are maps from the 1840s; first hand accounts of the journey in the form of books and magazine articles; newspaper articles from Sacramento and San Francisco of the 1849 gold rush; photographs taken with a "mammoth camera" of Yosemite and the Willamette Valley by Carleton Watkins. So many things, in fact, that we've had to spread the program over 2 parts. Part I airs Sunday, April 9, 2017, at 5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT. Part II will follow next Sunday. Hope you can join us. Gary
    Apr 05, 2017 102
  • 30 Mar 2017
    We've all asked people their opinions because we think that they might know more than we do about something. I ask Vern if I've got a question about pocket watches. I ask Dan or Jeff if I've got a question about advertising or bottles. I ask Chris if I've got a question about Oriental antiques. In this week's show I examine the times when we might need to go to the next step--not ask a friend, but ask an expert who will likely charge a fee for his or her opinion. When does that pay off and when doesn't it? I've got multiple examples of when it doesn't, and a few in which it does, but when it does, it can make all the difference! It can be worth tens of thoussands of dollars. I'll share with you in this week's show those cases where I would have been completely stymied without going for outside help. In today's world advances in technology have made specialists all the more important, and, I ask you, what do you know about FTIR or XRF? Do you own one of these machines? But maybe sometime you'll need one. Please join us for this week's show on Using Outside Experts. We're on Sunday evening, April 2, 2017, at the usual time: 5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT. Gary
    96 Posted by Gary & Carol Stover
  • We've all asked people their opinions because we think that they might know more than we do about something. I ask Vern if I've got a question about pocket watches. I ask Dan or Jeff if I've got a question about advertising or bottles. I ask Chris if I've got a question about Oriental antiques. In this week's show I examine the times when we might need to go to the next step--not ask a friend, but ask an expert who will likely charge a fee for his or her opinion. When does that pay off and when doesn't it? I've got multiple examples of when it doesn't, and a few in which it does, but when it does, it can make all the difference! It can be worth tens of thoussands of dollars. I'll share with you in this week's show those cases where I would have been completely stymied without going for outside help. In today's world advances in technology have made specialists all the more important, and, I ask you, what do you know about FTIR or XRF? Do you own one of these machines? But maybe sometime you'll need one. Please join us for this week's show on Using Outside Experts. We're on Sunday evening, April 2, 2017, at the usual time: 5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT. Gary
    Mar 30, 2017 96

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