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Gary & Carol Stover 's Entries

413 blogs
  • 27 Sep 2018
    I was recently asked by the owners of an Old Masters painting to tell them about it. What's the date, where was it painted, who is the subject of the portrait, who was the artist, etc. This work offers an opportunity to examine a painting that has hardly been touched by restoration, so it's in almost original state--it's not been relined, the strecher is original, the frame is probably original. The painting is unsigned, and there's really no provenance. It's a challenge, but we've made some headway, and maybe a viewer will be able to help us with additional information. Please let me know what you think.
    67 Posted by Gary & Carol Stover
  • I was recently asked by the owners of an Old Masters painting to tell them about it. What's the date, where was it painted, who is the subject of the portrait, who was the artist, etc. This work offers an opportunity to examine a painting that has hardly been touched by restoration, so it's in almost original state--it's not been relined, the strecher is original, the frame is probably original. The painting is unsigned, and there's really no provenance. It's a challenge, but we've made some headway, and maybe a viewer will be able to help us with additional information. Please let me know what you think.
    Sep 27, 2018 67
  • 19 Sep 2018
    We all like certainty, and we expect to know what something is when we buy it. If we don't, then at least we expect to be able to find out what it is after we've researched it. What happens, however, if, after research, we still don't know exactly what we've got, but it's in our inventory, and we've got to sell it? Pretend it's what we hoped it would be?? Don't describe it, and hope that someone else will believe that it's what we hoped it would be?? Price it at what we paid for it, and hope for the best?? Sometimes it really is impossible to be certain. In this show I'll describe a few pieces I acquired and never really was able to find out what I had.
    55 Posted by Gary & Carol Stover
  • We all like certainty, and we expect to know what something is when we buy it. If we don't, then at least we expect to be able to find out what it is after we've researched it. What happens, however, if, after research, we still don't know exactly what we've got, but it's in our inventory, and we've got to sell it? Pretend it's what we hoped it would be?? Don't describe it, and hope that someone else will believe that it's what we hoped it would be?? Price it at what we paid for it, and hope for the best?? Sometimes it really is impossible to be certain. In this show I'll describe a few pieces I acquired and never really was able to find out what I had.
    Sep 19, 2018 55
  • 12 Sep 2018
    A couple of months ago I did a show entitled, "Deciding Which Projects to Take On." The idea is that it is sometimes difficult to determine in advance whether to take the time and make the effort to take on the sale of an entire collection, especially when the category is not one you specialize in. I was confronted with the dilema of deciding whether to invest hours, weeks, months? in buying then selling a collection of aerospace materials originating with the Glenn L. Martin Company in the early '60's (they developed the Titan missles), and/or buying then selling a collection of antique masks and other primarily Asian vintage and antique items. In the end I turned down the aerospace items, but took on the Asian items. In this follow up show I'll show you what pieces I acquired and how I've priced them.
    147 Posted by Gary & Carol Stover
  • A couple of months ago I did a show entitled, "Deciding Which Projects to Take On." The idea is that it is sometimes difficult to determine in advance whether to take the time and make the effort to take on the sale of an entire collection, especially when the category is not one you specialize in. I was confronted with the dilema of deciding whether to invest hours, weeks, months? in buying then selling a collection of aerospace materials originating with the Glenn L. Martin Company in the early '60's (they developed the Titan missles), and/or buying then selling a collection of antique masks and other primarily Asian vintage and antique items. In the end I turned down the aerospace items, but took on the Asian items. In this follow up show I'll show you what pieces I acquired and how I've priced them.
    Sep 12, 2018 147
  • 06 Sep 2018
    I really didn't know how to title this show. What I'm trying to do in this video is compare prices for living artists vs dead artists, gallery prices vs mall prices, prints vs original works of art, and pretty much everything else that goes into determining value for paintings. To demonstrate the variables I chose 4 works of art, all with Native American or Western themes, and all belonging to the same vendor (not me). So, I discuss a serigraph by Bruce King, an acrylic by Bruce King, a serigraph by Earl Biss, and an oil on canvas by Maria Sharylen. Please let me know what you think. Thanks.
    126 Posted by Gary & Carol Stover
  • I really didn't know how to title this show. What I'm trying to do in this video is compare prices for living artists vs dead artists, gallery prices vs mall prices, prints vs original works of art, and pretty much everything else that goes into determining value for paintings. To demonstrate the variables I chose 4 works of art, all with Native American or Western themes, and all belonging to the same vendor (not me). So, I discuss a serigraph by Bruce King, an acrylic by Bruce King, a serigraph by Earl Biss, and an oil on canvas by Maria Sharylen. Please let me know what you think. Thanks.
    Sep 06, 2018 126
  • 29 Aug 2018
    This week's show profiles antique & vintage enamelware in all its various forms, including graniteware. For all its defects, most notably rusting, these colorful kitchen items have remained popular through the years. They were uniformly inexpensive when retailed initiallly through stores like Sears, but now certain features can add value as they've become collectibles. Please let me know if you find these pieces attractive.
    105 Posted by Gary & Carol Stover
  • This week's show profiles antique & vintage enamelware in all its various forms, including graniteware. For all its defects, most notably rusting, these colorful kitchen items have remained popular through the years. They were uniformly inexpensive when retailed initiallly through stores like Sears, but now certain features can add value as they've become collectibles. Please let me know if you find these pieces attractive.
    Aug 29, 2018 105
  • 21 Aug 2018
    Many vintage posters from the 1960's & '70's have increased in value as younger collectors have joined the collectors who grew up in that era. In this week's show I'll profile 2 outstanding collections of vintage posters that are now out for sale at the Brass Armadillo Antique Mall in Denver. One of those collections features San Francisco rock posters from the Avalon Ballroom and the other has posters designed by Gene Hoffman for various advertisers, including skiing venues, the Denver Broncos, and others. Let me know which ones you like.
    100 Posted by Gary & Carol Stover
  • Many vintage posters from the 1960's & '70's have increased in value as younger collectors have joined the collectors who grew up in that era. In this week's show I'll profile 2 outstanding collections of vintage posters that are now out for sale at the Brass Armadillo Antique Mall in Denver. One of those collections features San Francisco rock posters from the Avalon Ballroom and the other has posters designed by Gene Hoffman for various advertisers, including skiing venues, the Denver Broncos, and others. Let me know which ones you like.
    Aug 21, 2018 100
  • 15 Aug 2018
    This month's Bargain Show profiles great buys from several categories: an antique or vintage handmade carved wooden ship (probably the Nina, Pinta, or Santa Maria), a c.1920 belt with a tennis motif made by the Martin Company of England, a non-divided back real photo postcard depicting Buffalo Bill, some vintage stereovision 3-D glass with display card from the 1970's, a western painting done by an art teacher in Nevada (c.1960), a great stained glass window, and a primitive water keg clad in brass--rare. We'll be giving away one of these pieces (which ever one I decide is the best bargain), and to enter your name in the drawing, just like my facebook page.
    99 Posted by Gary & Carol Stover
  • This month's Bargain Show profiles great buys from several categories: an antique or vintage handmade carved wooden ship (probably the Nina, Pinta, or Santa Maria), a c.1920 belt with a tennis motif made by the Martin Company of England, a non-divided back real photo postcard depicting Buffalo Bill, some vintage stereovision 3-D glass with display card from the 1970's, a western painting done by an art teacher in Nevada (c.1960), a great stained glass window, and a primitive water keg clad in brass--rare. We'll be giving away one of these pieces (which ever one I decide is the best bargain), and to enter your name in the drawing, just like my facebook page.
    Aug 15, 2018 99
  • 12 Aug 2018
    This is our bi-montly Appraisal Show at the Brass Armadillo Antique Mall in Denver. People from the metro area brought in a great variety of antiques & collectibles for Tom, Chris, and Gary to appraise. The oldest item was an oreodont--know what this is? There was a rare magazine stand made by the Lake Side Craft Shop, a fabulous Tiffany & Co sterling silver bowl, and many other interesting pieces. Check it out on Youtube.
    114 Posted by Gary & Carol Stover
  • This is our bi-montly Appraisal Show at the Brass Armadillo Antique Mall in Denver. People from the metro area brought in a great variety of antiques & collectibles for Tom, Chris, and Gary to appraise. The oldest item was an oreodont--know what this is? There was a rare magazine stand made by the Lake Side Craft Shop, a fabulous Tiffany & Co sterling silver bowl, and many other interesting pieces. Check it out on Youtube.
    Aug 12, 2018 114
  • 08 Aug 2018
    In this week's program we take a look at Wildlife Photography. I've done a number of shows on various aspects of photography for collectors, and I think that wildlife photography offers very real opportunities, for it seems to me that in comparison with other categories of photographic images, it goes under the radar. Walking through Thomas Mangelsen's studio here in Denver is an experience one will never forget. I can't imagine the skill and patience it took to capture these images. And what images!! But if you're inclined to get your feet wet in this category, there are some pitfalls. We'll touch on them too.
    87 Posted by Gary & Carol Stover
  • In this week's program we take a look at Wildlife Photography. I've done a number of shows on various aspects of photography for collectors, and I think that wildlife photography offers very real opportunities, for it seems to me that in comparison with other categories of photographic images, it goes under the radar. Walking through Thomas Mangelsen's studio here in Denver is an experience one will never forget. I can't imagine the skill and patience it took to capture these images. And what images!! But if you're inclined to get your feet wet in this category, there are some pitfalls. We'll touch on them too.
    Aug 08, 2018 87
  • 31 Jul 2018
    At the conclusion of every year of my doing shows on antiques I put forth for your consideration a rule to guide antique dealers. I'm late with this year's rule (our anniversary comes in May), but I'm glad I waited, as recent events have caused me to revise an earlier rule and to formulate a rule that addresses a pattern of behavior that has become all pervasive in our industry. My old Rule 3 was "You can beat anybody at this game, but you can't beat Christie's and Sotheby's." I've revised that rule to "You can beat anybody at this game." Rule 8 is "Never trust an expert." And I mean NEVER EVER TRUST AN EXPERT. Rule 7 was "Always seek a second opinion." That no longer is enougn. Old boys and girls networks in every category have banded together in an attempt to cover up past mistakes by saying new technology doesn't work. "Trust me, not science." There are ways around this, and we'll discuss them in this week's program.
    85 Posted by Gary & Carol Stover
  • At the conclusion of every year of my doing shows on antiques I put forth for your consideration a rule to guide antique dealers. I'm late with this year's rule (our anniversary comes in May), but I'm glad I waited, as recent events have caused me to revise an earlier rule and to formulate a rule that addresses a pattern of behavior that has become all pervasive in our industry. My old Rule 3 was "You can beat anybody at this game, but you can't beat Christie's and Sotheby's." I've revised that rule to "You can beat anybody at this game." Rule 8 is "Never trust an expert." And I mean NEVER EVER TRUST AN EXPERT. Rule 7 was "Always seek a second opinion." That no longer is enougn. Old boys and girls networks in every category have banded together in an attempt to cover up past mistakes by saying new technology doesn't work. "Trust me, not science." There are ways around this, and we'll discuss them in this week's program.
    Jul 31, 2018 85