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  • 16 Mar 2011
    I believe in taking kids antiquing. Well, as long as it's at a shop without commas in the price tags.    My kids and I adore a good waltz through antique shops and thrift stores throughout the area. The dustier, darker and more cluttered the store? The better. It's like we get to step right into the pages of both of our obsessions: my kids' beloved I SPY books (books full of photographs seemingly taken in grandmas' attics and abandoned toy stores), and my much-drooled-upon faux vintage-filled Anthropologie catalogs. At almost five and seven, my kids are old enough to keep their hands firmly clasped and (mostly) abide by the strict rule of no touching as we walk through these treasure troves. Of course, we avoid the chi-chi stores that are super heavy on the china and crystal, and the ones where the majority of the price tags have commas. The three of us love both artfully-arranged shops, as well as old, dank places where happening upon a neverending story book or an enchanted wardrobe seem possible. We've met the coolest shop keepers who are often bored awaiting the infrequent big shot collectors, and are only too eager to explain and show some of their favorite pieces to inquisitive little kids. If the kids are good and mind the no-touch rule, they get a cookie and cocoa at an equally old-school tea room or maybe a cheap trinket as a reward.   READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT: http://wheaton-md.patch.com/articles/antique-store-and-thrift-shop-fun-with-kids
    1166 Posted by IAntique News
  • I believe in taking kids antiquing. Well, as long as it's at a shop without commas in the price tags.    My kids and I adore a good waltz through antique shops and thrift stores throughout the area. The dustier, darker and more cluttered the store? The better. It's like we get to step right into the pages of both of our obsessions: my kids' beloved I SPY books (books full of photographs seemingly taken in grandmas' attics and abandoned toy stores), and my much-drooled-upon faux vintage-filled Anthropologie catalogs. At almost five and seven, my kids are old enough to keep their hands firmly clasped and (mostly) abide by the strict rule of no touching as we walk through these treasure troves. Of course, we avoid the chi-chi stores that are super heavy on the china and crystal, and the ones where the majority of the price tags have commas. The three of us love both artfully-arranged shops, as well as old, dank places where happening upon a neverending story book or an enchanted wardrobe seem possible. We've met the coolest shop keepers who are often bored awaiting the infrequent big shot collectors, and are only too eager to explain and show some of their favorite pieces to inquisitive little kids. If the kids are good and mind the no-touch rule, they get a cookie and cocoa at an equally old-school tea room or maybe a cheap trinket as a reward.   READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE AT: http://wheaton-md.patch.com/articles/antique-store-and-thrift-shop-fun-with-kids
    Mar 16, 2011 1166
  • 15 Mar 2011
    All Brass Armadillo Antique Malls are offering 15% off any of their items listed in the Classifieds area of iAntique.com from March 16th to March 20th.   This sale is in conjunction with their sales that run in their malls on March 18-19-20   If you find something you would like to purchase, you can contact them directly by phone.  Their toll-free number is listed in the item's description.   Note:  This is the first time iAntique has become involved in the promotion of an online sale through our Classifieds system.  We look forward to utilizing this type of promotion in the future and encourage any antique store or mall to contact us if they would like to discuss such sales.   Phoenix Brass Armadillo items - Click Here Denver Brass Armadillo items - Click Here Kansas City Brass Armadillo items - Click Here Omaha Brass Armadillo items - Click Here Des Moines Brass Armadillo items - Click Here
    1260 Posted by IAntique News
  • All Brass Armadillo Antique Malls are offering 15% off any of their items listed in the Classifieds area of iAntique.com from March 16th to March 20th.   This sale is in conjunction with their sales that run in their malls on March 18-19-20   If you find something you would like to purchase, you can contact them directly by phone.  Their toll-free number is listed in the item's description.   Note:  This is the first time iAntique has become involved in the promotion of an online sale through our Classifieds system.  We look forward to utilizing this type of promotion in the future and encourage any antique store or mall to contact us if they would like to discuss such sales.   Phoenix Brass Armadillo items - Click Here Denver Brass Armadillo items - Click Here Kansas City Brass Armadillo items - Click Here Omaha Brass Armadillo items - Click Here Des Moines Brass Armadillo items - Click Here
    Mar 15, 2011 1260
  • 20 Jan 2011
    About 1,000 history books from the acclaimed collection of the late John McClelland Jr. — former longtime editor and publisher of The Daily News — will go on the auction block today in California. McClelland was a noted regional historian and collected books about the Northwest for much of his adult life. All told, the avid reader had about 3,000 books in his Seattle library home, daughter Genevieve Lee said Wednesday. The highlight of today's auction likely will be McClelland's copy of the first edition of George Vancouver's accounts of his travels and atlas - valued between $25,000 and $35,000, according to auction officials. Several other books and maps will be sold in more than 300 "lots" or collections. McClelland and his family began downsizing about two years ago, including selling his prized golf book collection in February. His Northwest history books, though, were too precious for McClelland to part with while still alive. "He wanted to keep those with him," Lee said. "He knew (auctioning them) was the plan but wanted to have the Northwest books around while he was alive." Read the entire article here:  http://tdn.com/news/local/article_99d02e02-2441-11e0-b63b-001cc4c002e0.html  
    1074 Posted by IAntique News
  • About 1,000 history books from the acclaimed collection of the late John McClelland Jr. — former longtime editor and publisher of The Daily News — will go on the auction block today in California. McClelland was a noted regional historian and collected books about the Northwest for much of his adult life. All told, the avid reader had about 3,000 books in his Seattle library home, daughter Genevieve Lee said Wednesday. The highlight of today's auction likely will be McClelland's copy of the first edition of George Vancouver's accounts of his travels and atlas - valued between $25,000 and $35,000, according to auction officials. Several other books and maps will be sold in more than 300 "lots" or collections. McClelland and his family began downsizing about two years ago, including selling his prized golf book collection in February. His Northwest history books, though, were too precious for McClelland to part with while still alive. "He wanted to keep those with him," Lee said. "He knew (auctioning them) was the plan but wanted to have the Northwest books around while he was alive." Read the entire article here:  http://tdn.com/news/local/article_99d02e02-2441-11e0-b63b-001cc4c002e0.html  
    Jan 20, 2011 1074
  • 09 Jan 2011
    Fieldale, VA - A Fieldale man has restored a former Shell gas station and transformed it into a store he's always dreamed about opening. This looks like a Shell gas station from the 1950s, but owner R.B. Hundley says, you can't fill up at it. "I've had a lot of people come by and want to fill up on gas or want a break job or a lube job but no, it's a play toy," he said. As a child, he'd visit the former gas station; it was a local hang out spot. When it closed down, it became nothing but an eyesore, but Hundley says, he saw potential. "I thought it was a great location and a great little town to put a little shop. This little town needs a little spark and I thought this might would give it to them," he said. He restored the service station and made it a business. Inside, you'll find plenty of antiques for sale: old coca cola machines, lamps and furniture. READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE: www.wset.com/Global/story.asp
    1116 Posted by IAntique News
  • Fieldale, VA - A Fieldale man has restored a former Shell gas station and transformed it into a store he's always dreamed about opening. This looks like a Shell gas station from the 1950s, but owner R.B. Hundley says, you can't fill up at it. "I've had a lot of people come by and want to fill up on gas or want a break job or a lube job but no, it's a play toy," he said. As a child, he'd visit the former gas station; it was a local hang out spot. When it closed down, it became nothing but an eyesore, but Hundley says, he saw potential. "I thought it was a great location and a great little town to put a little shop. This little town needs a little spark and I thought this might would give it to them," he said. He restored the service station and made it a business. Inside, you'll find plenty of antiques for sale: old coca cola machines, lamps and furniture. READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE: www.wset.com/Global/story.asp
    Jan 09, 2011 1116
  • 09 Jan 2011
    Greenwood, MO - Q&A with Sandee Millett JOB DESCRIPTION: Owner of two antique stores, Millett & Co, specializing in country items, 808 W. Main St., 816-537-7129; and Greenwood Mercantile, specializing in primitives, 409 W. Main St., 816-537-7033. Organizer of the Old Summit Country Antique Show, specializing in early American country, several times each year. Tell us about your home. My husband, B.C., and I live on an acre in a farmhouse in Lee’s Summit. We’ve been there 20 years. It has a big porch. Our son, Nathan, is renovating a Cape Cod in Union Hill. Do you collect anything? I love gray graniteware, crocks, cubbies, spice boxes, old candy jars and anything associated with candy. What’s your favorite room in your home? The hearth room. It’s painted a yummy yellow, the color of yellow ware. The brick fireplace has a mantel where I’ve displayed green ware and yellow ware bowls. The hearth is deep, and I’ve got children’s chairs there. The rectangular clock above it was my great-grandparents’. We saw a similar clock when we visited Grant’s Farm in St. Louis. The room is just so inviting and cozy, and off the kitchen. Read more: http://www.kansascity.com/2011/01/08/2561330/antique-store-owner-sandee-millett.html#ixzz1AYrVRQ8i
    997 Posted by IAntique News
  • Greenwood, MO - Q&A with Sandee Millett JOB DESCRIPTION: Owner of two antique stores, Millett & Co, specializing in country items, 808 W. Main St., 816-537-7129; and Greenwood Mercantile, specializing in primitives, 409 W. Main St., 816-537-7033. Organizer of the Old Summit Country Antique Show, specializing in early American country, several times each year. Tell us about your home. My husband, B.C., and I live on an acre in a farmhouse in Lee’s Summit. We’ve been there 20 years. It has a big porch. Our son, Nathan, is renovating a Cape Cod in Union Hill. Do you collect anything? I love gray graniteware, crocks, cubbies, spice boxes, old candy jars and anything associated with candy. What’s your favorite room in your home? The hearth room. It’s painted a yummy yellow, the color of yellow ware. The brick fireplace has a mantel where I’ve displayed green ware and yellow ware bowls. The hearth is deep, and I’ve got children’s chairs there. The rectangular clock above it was my great-grandparents’. We saw a similar clock when we visited Grant’s Farm in St. Louis. The room is just so inviting and cozy, and off the kitchen. Read more: http://www.kansascity.com/2011/01/08/2561330/antique-store-owner-sandee-millett.html#ixzz1AYrVRQ8i
    Jan 09, 2011 997
  • 09 Jan 2011
    SF - CA  Sometimes big things come in small packages. Other times, well, nature dictates that big things just have to come in even bigger packages. And it's those large-scale, leftover wonders of the world that occasionally find their way into an artful landscape of salvage at Big Daddy's Antiques. The 18-year-old Los Angeles shop spread to San Francisco in late fall. Adjacent to Thee Parkside in Potrero Hill, it anchors the ever-widening eastern design district. Famed for his business' substantial real estate at the Alameda Point Antiques and Collectibles Faire, owner Shane Brown had wanted to make the move for years. "We do extremely well there, and everyone was bummed out that we weren't in San Francisco full time," says Brown. The right space - a 13,000-square-foot warehouse spaciously crafted in the 1920s to build ships - was the final lure. Big Daddy's lives up to the name with a catchall of outsize pieces - from rusted old store signage to 7-foot-tall wood birdcages and perhaps even, yes, a model schooner (actually a Treasure Island movie prop). Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2011/01/07/HOHV1H365C.DTL#ixzz1AYqnIPH1
    1011 Posted by IAntique News
  • SF - CA  Sometimes big things come in small packages. Other times, well, nature dictates that big things just have to come in even bigger packages. And it's those large-scale, leftover wonders of the world that occasionally find their way into an artful landscape of salvage at Big Daddy's Antiques. The 18-year-old Los Angeles shop spread to San Francisco in late fall. Adjacent to Thee Parkside in Potrero Hill, it anchors the ever-widening eastern design district. Famed for his business' substantial real estate at the Alameda Point Antiques and Collectibles Faire, owner Shane Brown had wanted to make the move for years. "We do extremely well there, and everyone was bummed out that we weren't in San Francisco full time," says Brown. The right space - a 13,000-square-foot warehouse spaciously crafted in the 1920s to build ships - was the final lure. Big Daddy's lives up to the name with a catchall of outsize pieces - from rusted old store signage to 7-foot-tall wood birdcages and perhaps even, yes, a model schooner (actually a Treasure Island movie prop). Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2011/01/07/HOHV1H365C.DTL#ixzz1AYqnIPH1
    Jan 09, 2011 1011
  • 27 Dec 2010
    LOWER TOWNSHIP, N.J. - They began with little things. A couple of rusty old train lanterns, some farm implements, a device called a "toe-toaster" that let its users brown slices of bread in the kitchen fireplace and flip them with their feet. Eventually, their collectors' ardor wasn't satisfied by garage sales and flea markets and Patricia Anne "Annie" Salvatore and her husband, Joseph, began to scout "antique" buildings. Their passion led to 26 acquisitions - including a blacksmith shed, carpentry shop, and carriage house - at what is now Cold Spring Village, a 30-acre living-history museum on Route 9 about three miles north of Cape May. Read more: http://www.philly.com/inquirer/local/nj/20101227_New_Jersey_living-history_museum_started_with_one_couple_s_passion_for_antiques.html#ixzz19KtDp2zw  
    1379 Posted by IAntique News
  • LOWER TOWNSHIP, N.J. - They began with little things. A couple of rusty old train lanterns, some farm implements, a device called a "toe-toaster" that let its users brown slices of bread in the kitchen fireplace and flip them with their feet. Eventually, their collectors' ardor wasn't satisfied by garage sales and flea markets and Patricia Anne "Annie" Salvatore and her husband, Joseph, began to scout "antique" buildings. Their passion led to 26 acquisitions - including a blacksmith shed, carpentry shop, and carriage house - at what is now Cold Spring Village, a 30-acre living-history museum on Route 9 about three miles north of Cape May. Read more: http://www.philly.com/inquirer/local/nj/20101227_New_Jersey_living-history_museum_started_with_one_couple_s_passion_for_antiques.html#ixzz19KtDp2zw  
    Dec 27, 2010 1379
  • 19 Dec 2010
     Sotheby's in New York is reporting the sale of  a collection of Malcom Forbes toys. The sale was dated Dec 17th, 2010 The Malcolm Forbes Toy Collection presents the toy boats, soldiers, motorcycles and classic board games lovingly gathered over nearly four decades by legendary collector Malcolm Forbes and his sons. More Notes from the sale page:  The major portion of the sale will consist of a captivating array of sports, naval, commercial and luxury toy boats - arguably one of the finest collections of its type in the world. It reflects the best examples from the 1870s through the 1950s, which is known as the Golden Age of Toys, and includes examples from every major toy boat maker, many originating from the Nuremburg area in Germany, among them Märklin, Bing, Fleischmann and Carette. The largest toy boat in the collection, 47" long, is the cast-iron French Gas-Powered Heavily Armored Gunboat (est. $200/300,000), a replica of a 19th century battleship with a gas-powered engine and zinc and bronze details also known as “Andre the Giant.” A top lot of the sale, it is currently the only known example of its kind. Also among the featured lots is the Märklin recreation of the Cunard Line’s "Lusitania" ocean liner (est. $100/200,000), which was sunk in 1915 by a German submarine, helping to precipitate America's entry into World War I.  
    882 Posted by IAntique News
  •  Sotheby's in New York is reporting the sale of  a collection of Malcom Forbes toys. The sale was dated Dec 17th, 2010 The Malcolm Forbes Toy Collection presents the toy boats, soldiers, motorcycles and classic board games lovingly gathered over nearly four decades by legendary collector Malcolm Forbes and his sons. More Notes from the sale page:  The major portion of the sale will consist of a captivating array of sports, naval, commercial and luxury toy boats - arguably one of the finest collections of its type in the world. It reflects the best examples from the 1870s through the 1950s, which is known as the Golden Age of Toys, and includes examples from every major toy boat maker, many originating from the Nuremburg area in Germany, among them Märklin, Bing, Fleischmann and Carette. The largest toy boat in the collection, 47" long, is the cast-iron French Gas-Powered Heavily Armored Gunboat (est. $200/300,000), a replica of a 19th century battleship with a gas-powered engine and zinc and bronze details also known as “Andre the Giant.” A top lot of the sale, it is currently the only known example of its kind. Also among the featured lots is the Märklin recreation of the Cunard Line’s "Lusitania" ocean liner (est. $100/200,000), which was sunk in 1915 by a German submarine, helping to precipitate America's entry into World War I.  
    Dec 19, 2010 882
  • 19 Dec 2010
    Annapolis MD - Local antiques lovers are getting a lump of coal in their holiday stockings. The Historic Annapolis Antiques Show won't be held next month, ending a 40-year tradition. "I'm sorry, but that's the way it is," said Bob Armacost, owner of Armacost Antiques Shows in Baltimore, which ran the annual event. Armacost said that when Historic Annapolis Foundation decided earlier this year to pull out, his company opted to skip the event. He admitted that the economy also affected the decision not to hold the show, which was at the Medford National Guard Armory off West Street. HAF does plan to bring back the show in some form, at some time, but there are no definitive plans yet, Carrie Kiewitt, vice president of advancement for the organization, said Thursday. "We're weighing our different options," she said. The show was meant as a fundraiser for HAF, but as the antiques business declined in past years, it became a lot of work for very little return, she said. Changes at Armacost's company also played a role in the decision to pull out, she said. "We didn't want it to go away, it's still a part of our mission, but it has to fit our needs and we (also) want it to fit the desires of the public."   Read the complete article here:  www.hometownannapolis.com/news/top/2010/12/19-54/Annapolis-Antiques-Show-is-history.html HomeTownAnnapolis.com
    1109 Posted by IAntique News
  • Annapolis MD - Local antiques lovers are getting a lump of coal in their holiday stockings. The Historic Annapolis Antiques Show won't be held next month, ending a 40-year tradition. "I'm sorry, but that's the way it is," said Bob Armacost, owner of Armacost Antiques Shows in Baltimore, which ran the annual event. Armacost said that when Historic Annapolis Foundation decided earlier this year to pull out, his company opted to skip the event. He admitted that the economy also affected the decision not to hold the show, which was at the Medford National Guard Armory off West Street. HAF does plan to bring back the show in some form, at some time, but there are no definitive plans yet, Carrie Kiewitt, vice president of advancement for the organization, said Thursday. "We're weighing our different options," she said. The show was meant as a fundraiser for HAF, but as the antiques business declined in past years, it became a lot of work for very little return, she said. Changes at Armacost's company also played a role in the decision to pull out, she said. "We didn't want it to go away, it's still a part of our mission, but it has to fit our needs and we (also) want it to fit the desires of the public."   Read the complete article here:  www.hometownannapolis.com/news/top/2010/12/19-54/Annapolis-Antiques-Show-is-history.html HomeTownAnnapolis.com
    Dec 19, 2010 1109
  • 13 Dec 2010
     If you are considering buying something such as say, a used car, you might consult a list in a price guide to find out details of your intended purchase. Generally these guides, often referred to as a buyer’s guide will list all the comparable specifics of the car you are interested in together with variances for model, milage and condition. Real-estate people use prices of previous property sales as comparables in order to estimate current house values. Basically cars and real-estate prices are established by checking out the competition to check out the going rate and to compare what similar properties (or vehicles) have sold for. Although antique dealers and auctions use similar methods, establishing the age and value of collectibles and antiques presents something more of a problem than do cars or real-estate. Guides are simply that; a guide, a sort of overview to point you in the right direction. Guides are meant for reference only and are not a definitive authority of actual market value. Most guides will offer a range of prices intended to cover anticipated minimum and maximum values. Also, and most importantly, all price guides are well out of date before they even get to the shelves of the bookstores. Just as fashions for clothing are determined several seasons in advance, price guides are compiled anywhere from 12-18 months ahead of publication.   Read the entire article here; http://www.bclocalnews.com/vancouver_island_north/northislandmidweek/lifestyles/111809299.html
    902 Posted by IAntique News
  •  If you are considering buying something such as say, a used car, you might consult a list in a price guide to find out details of your intended purchase. Generally these guides, often referred to as a buyer’s guide will list all the comparable specifics of the car you are interested in together with variances for model, milage and condition. Real-estate people use prices of previous property sales as comparables in order to estimate current house values. Basically cars and real-estate prices are established by checking out the competition to check out the going rate and to compare what similar properties (or vehicles) have sold for. Although antique dealers and auctions use similar methods, establishing the age and value of collectibles and antiques presents something more of a problem than do cars or real-estate. Guides are simply that; a guide, a sort of overview to point you in the right direction. Guides are meant for reference only and are not a definitive authority of actual market value. Most guides will offer a range of prices intended to cover anticipated minimum and maximum values. Also, and most importantly, all price guides are well out of date before they even get to the shelves of the bookstores. Just as fashions for clothing are determined several seasons in advance, price guides are compiled anywhere from 12-18 months ahead of publication.   Read the entire article here; http://www.bclocalnews.com/vancouver_island_north/northislandmidweek/lifestyles/111809299.html
    Dec 13, 2010 902