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  • 11 Sep 2015
    I am on a quest of sorts, to delve into a mystery. An antique pedal car was brought to my attention recently and I was asked if I could uncover its origin and details. I was given a few photos and the dimensions but little else. But I am getting ahead of myself. As with any good mystery story should begin, let’s start at the beginning. The first pedal cars was introduced by Karl Benz in the 1880’s and soon the market was flooded with a playful equivalent designed for children – the antique toy pedal car. By the early 1900s pedal cars were ubiquitous in the USA and Great Britain. One of the first companies to make three-wheel velocipedes for children was Whitney Reed, whose wooden horse pulling a sulky is a classic of the early form—the horse’s jointed legs moved when the operator pushed the pedals. Because automobiles are the main type of pedal toy sought by collectors, pedal toys like the early Whitney Reeds can be surprisingly easy to acquire. “Juvenile Steel Automobiles” were manufactured by the Butler brothers around this point. These cars boasted chassis made from sheet-steel, double-spoke wheels and open steering systems, bottoms and pedals. Models included the Scorcher, the Wizard, and the Speedwell. The pedal version of the best-selling Ford Model T was especially popular among children, and remains highly prized today. Before the outbreak of the First World War, pedal cars designed in the style of Grand Prix Peugeots were being manufactured and sold in Paris. Following the war’s end, Eureka, a French toy maker of considerable note, continues this trend, making pedal cars fashioned after Peugeots, as well as Renaults and the Citroen Rosalie. In Great Britain, Lines Bros had created lines of more than 30 different types of pedal car, which were duly advertised in its 1937/1938 catalogue. Prince, a fairly basic model was designed for younger children (2 to 4 year olds), while the Electric Rolls, which starred an electric motor – thus its name – was presumably designed for slightly older, and rather aspirant children. The impressive toy car also featured working brakes and headlights, real Dunlop tires (including a spare), and chrome-plated rims. As for its performance, it could travel 12 to 15 miles on a single charge and had a top speed of 5 mph. The interwar period proved to be an important time for pedal car manufacturers, who saw their products’ popularity grow exponentially. Pedal cars became so ubiquitous they were even fixtures in the Sears catalogues of the era. However, pedal cars could only be sent from Sears to customers who lived near railway lines because mailing a steel car, even a small one, was impossible. Other companies that made pedal cars in the ’20s and ’30s included American National Automobiles of Toledo and Steelcraft of Murray, both based in Ohio. Among other products, Steelcraft made GMC pedal trucks, as well as Mack dump trucks, Model T Roadsters, Dodge Runabouts, and a Chrysler Roadster, which had bullet-shaped headlights and rubber tires. Steelcraft’s Chrysler was 50-inches long, and could be yours for only $31.50. After World War II, the J-40 (or Junior Forty) made by Lines Bros. in Wales by retired miners and modeled after the 1949 Austin A-40 was probably the most popular pedal car in England. In the 1950s, the company offered 33 pressed-steel-body pedal cars, its heavily chromed Triang Centurion being the top of the line. By the early 1960s, the company experimented with novelty cars such as the Noddy, which was like a small go-kart, but as the decade progressed it reverted back to pedal cars based on real automobiles such as the MG Midget. Pedal cars were also popular in Australia. In fact, they have such a rich history there that the government recently issued a series of toy-theme stamps, including one with a red Cyclops pedal car from 1953. Though based in Australia, many of Cyclops’s pedal car designs were based on U.S. models and manufacturers, from Buick and Chevrolet, to Pontiac and Packard. Ok, back to the present. I exhaustively searched online for as much material and information that I could find to determine the make and model of this particular pedal car. However, the internet held little tangible information to aid me in identifying this model. So, I am asking you, the readers, to help me in this search. The pedal car is 43 inches long, 16 inches tall, and 16 inches wide. It weighs 25.6 lbs and is constructed of wood which, from my research, was uncommon in pedal car design. The car bears no manufacturing markings of any kind but does closely resemble others that I found online. At the bottom of this article I have posted a url to a site that lists images of pedal cars from various period catalogs, along with each catalog source. So here is a call out to any of you amateur or professional antique sleuths out there to help me in identifying this pedal car. You can, of course, post responses in the comments below! http://www.oldcatalogsrevisited.com/toypedc.shtml
    988 Posted by Brucha Junovitch
  • I am on a quest of sorts, to delve into a mystery. An antique pedal car was brought to my attention recently and I was asked if I could uncover its origin and details. I was given a few photos and the dimensions but little else. But I am getting ahead of myself. As with any good mystery story should begin, let’s start at the beginning. The first pedal cars was introduced by Karl Benz in the 1880’s and soon the market was flooded with a playful equivalent designed for children – the antique toy pedal car. By the early 1900s pedal cars were ubiquitous in the USA and Great Britain. One of the first companies to make three-wheel velocipedes for children was Whitney Reed, whose wooden horse pulling a sulky is a classic of the early form—the horse’s jointed legs moved when the operator pushed the pedals. Because automobiles are the main type of pedal toy sought by collectors, pedal toys like the early Whitney Reeds can be surprisingly easy to acquire. “Juvenile Steel Automobiles” were manufactured by the Butler brothers around this point. These cars boasted chassis made from sheet-steel, double-spoke wheels and open steering systems, bottoms and pedals. Models included the Scorcher, the Wizard, and the Speedwell. The pedal version of the best-selling Ford Model T was especially popular among children, and remains highly prized today. Before the outbreak of the First World War, pedal cars designed in the style of Grand Prix Peugeots were being manufactured and sold in Paris. Following the war’s end, Eureka, a French toy maker of considerable note, continues this trend, making pedal cars fashioned after Peugeots, as well as Renaults and the Citroen Rosalie. In Great Britain, Lines Bros had created lines of more than 30 different types of pedal car, which were duly advertised in its 1937/1938 catalogue. Prince, a fairly basic model was designed for younger children (2 to 4 year olds), while the Electric Rolls, which starred an electric motor – thus its name – was presumably designed for slightly older, and rather aspirant children. The impressive toy car also featured working brakes and headlights, real Dunlop tires (including a spare), and chrome-plated rims. As for its performance, it could travel 12 to 15 miles on a single charge and had a top speed of 5 mph. The interwar period proved to be an important time for pedal car manufacturers, who saw their products’ popularity grow exponentially. Pedal cars became so ubiquitous they were even fixtures in the Sears catalogues of the era. However, pedal cars could only be sent from Sears to customers who lived near railway lines because mailing a steel car, even a small one, was impossible. Other companies that made pedal cars in the ’20s and ’30s included American National Automobiles of Toledo and Steelcraft of Murray, both based in Ohio. Among other products, Steelcraft made GMC pedal trucks, as well as Mack dump trucks, Model T Roadsters, Dodge Runabouts, and a Chrysler Roadster, which had bullet-shaped headlights and rubber tires. Steelcraft’s Chrysler was 50-inches long, and could be yours for only $31.50. After World War II, the J-40 (or Junior Forty) made by Lines Bros. in Wales by retired miners and modeled after the 1949 Austin A-40 was probably the most popular pedal car in England. In the 1950s, the company offered 33 pressed-steel-body pedal cars, its heavily chromed Triang Centurion being the top of the line. By the early 1960s, the company experimented with novelty cars such as the Noddy, which was like a small go-kart, but as the decade progressed it reverted back to pedal cars based on real automobiles such as the MG Midget. Pedal cars were also popular in Australia. In fact, they have such a rich history there that the government recently issued a series of toy-theme stamps, including one with a red Cyclops pedal car from 1953. Though based in Australia, many of Cyclops’s pedal car designs were based on U.S. models and manufacturers, from Buick and Chevrolet, to Pontiac and Packard. Ok, back to the present. I exhaustively searched online for as much material and information that I could find to determine the make and model of this particular pedal car. However, the internet held little tangible information to aid me in identifying this model. So, I am asking you, the readers, to help me in this search. The pedal car is 43 inches long, 16 inches tall, and 16 inches wide. It weighs 25.6 lbs and is constructed of wood which, from my research, was uncommon in pedal car design. The car bears no manufacturing markings of any kind but does closely resemble others that I found online. At the bottom of this article I have posted a url to a site that lists images of pedal cars from various period catalogs, along with each catalog source. So here is a call out to any of you amateur or professional antique sleuths out there to help me in identifying this pedal car. You can, of course, post responses in the comments below! http://www.oldcatalogsrevisited.com/toypedc.shtml
    Sep 11, 2015 988
  • 29 Jan 2014
    A common topic customers ask about are the differences between glazing (frame glass). Premium Clear by Tru Vue (regular) is 45% UV protected which is acceptable for inexpensive, “open edition” prints or posters (something of not great value). There are some prints or posters that should have good glass such as movie posters or band posters that may increase in value over time. 99% UV Conservation glass is much better protected from the sun.  Tru Vue 99% UV protected Museum glass is crystal clear (it cuts down glare and reflection, however it is not a “non-glare” glass). Regular clear window glass is not recommended for custom picture framing, although it’s commonly used. Regular window glass does not come pre-cleaned, and there’s usually oil and grit on it. It’s also thicker and heavier than picture frame glass. We also do NOT recommend non-glare glass for anything because it has a haze on it, which will decrease the visibility of the image. Most museums will not use non-glare glass either. The piece pictured below has Tru Vue Museum Glass 99% UV protection. The glare that you see is a glare from the record and not the glass.
    2314 Posted by Gary Rotenberger
  • A common topic customers ask about are the differences between glazing (frame glass). Premium Clear by Tru Vue (regular) is 45% UV protected which is acceptable for inexpensive, “open edition” prints or posters (something of not great value). There are some prints or posters that should have good glass such as movie posters or band posters that may increase in value over time. 99% UV Conservation glass is much better protected from the sun.  Tru Vue 99% UV protected Museum glass is crystal clear (it cuts down glare and reflection, however it is not a “non-glare” glass). Regular clear window glass is not recommended for custom picture framing, although it’s commonly used. Regular window glass does not come pre-cleaned, and there’s usually oil and grit on it. It’s also thicker and heavier than picture frame glass. We also do NOT recommend non-glare glass for anything because it has a haze on it, which will decrease the visibility of the image. Most museums will not use non-glare glass either. The piece pictured below has Tru Vue Museum Glass 99% UV protection. The glare that you see is a glare from the record and not the glass.
    Jan 29, 2014 2314
  • 19 Jan 2011
      While one of the benefits of this site is to help others with inquiries in regards to items, this assistance will usually come from the assistance of other members. Here are some tips to help you receive a response to your questions. FIRST: 1. Have you done any research yourself prior to asking for assistance. So often all you have to do is a search in Google (or another search engine) and you may find the answer. Keep your search key words simple. One of the best ways to educate yourself is through your own research. 2. Did you look through the RESOURCES tab at the upper left of the page when you are in iAntique? There are a number of resource sites listed which may help you and this list will be continually added to. 3. Search in sites such as ebay, both in the current and completed auction listings. Don't rely solely on an ebay item's description as being accurate. Too many items are often mis-identified and inaccuractely described, but this can be an additional search source. 4. Don't ask for help on an abundance of items. As any assistance that is shared will most likely be from other iAntique members who are willing to help out when possible, don't abuse this option. Listing a number of items will probably be passed by. Ask on one or two items, then maybe wait awhile before your next inquiry. THEN IF YOU WILL BE POSTING AN INQUIRY..........POST YOUR INQUIRY IN THE Q&A SECTION OF IANTIQUE:  5. Provide a detailed description of the item. Measurements or dimensions, any markings, what is it made of, condition, etc. Share as much information about the item as you can. This also includes correct spelling with your inquiry. 6. Photos are a must. Provide good clear photos and include a closeup of any manufacturers marks or labels if possible. 7. What do you know about it? FINALLY: As I have shared, more than likely the help you will be given will come from another iAntique member who has generously taken the time to do some research and share an answer. Take a few seconds of your time to say "thanks" to them for helping out. Good Luck!   Click Here to ask a question
    7112 Posted by Tom Norskov
  •   While one of the benefits of this site is to help others with inquiries in regards to items, this assistance will usually come from the assistance of other members. Here are some tips to help you receive a response to your questions. FIRST: 1. Have you done any research yourself prior to asking for assistance. So often all you have to do is a search in Google (or another search engine) and you may find the answer. Keep your search key words simple. One of the best ways to educate yourself is through your own research. 2. Did you look through the RESOURCES tab at the upper left of the page when you are in iAntique? There are a number of resource sites listed which may help you and this list will be continually added to. 3. Search in sites such as ebay, both in the current and completed auction listings. Don't rely solely on an ebay item's description as being accurate. Too many items are often mis-identified and inaccuractely described, but this can be an additional search source. 4. Don't ask for help on an abundance of items. As any assistance that is shared will most likely be from other iAntique members who are willing to help out when possible, don't abuse this option. Listing a number of items will probably be passed by. Ask on one or two items, then maybe wait awhile before your next inquiry. THEN IF YOU WILL BE POSTING AN INQUIRY..........POST YOUR INQUIRY IN THE Q&A SECTION OF IANTIQUE:  5. Provide a detailed description of the item. Measurements or dimensions, any markings, what is it made of, condition, etc. Share as much information about the item as you can. This also includes correct spelling with your inquiry. 6. Photos are a must. Provide good clear photos and include a closeup of any manufacturers marks or labels if possible. 7. What do you know about it? FINALLY: As I have shared, more than likely the help you will be given will come from another iAntique member who has generously taken the time to do some research and share an answer. Take a few seconds of your time to say "thanks" to them for helping out. Good Luck!   Click Here to ask a question
    Jan 19, 2011 7112