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  • 18 Apr 2018
    Please join us for this month's Bargain Show from the Brass Armadillo Antique Mall in Denver. The program will be uploaded in a few days--watch this site + youtube. There were some very interesting items in the Mall at real bargain prices: some c. 1800 pewter pieces one made by Thomas Danforth Boardman & his brother Sherman Boardman, a Sleepy Eye barrel cover, a Sears & Roebuck standing hair dryer, some purple glass, a c.1785 Irish mahogany chair, a porcelain doll by Swarovski in a case, a  Robinhood Ware tray, & much more. If you've liked my facebook page, then you're automatically entered into the drawing for the item I select as Best in the Mall. Gary
    22 Posted by Gary & Carol Stover
  • Please join us for this month's Bargain Show from the Brass Armadillo Antique Mall in Denver. The program will be uploaded in a few days--watch this site + youtube. There were some very interesting items in the Mall at real bargain prices: some c. 1800 pewter pieces one made by Thomas Danforth Boardman & his brother Sherman Boardman, a Sleepy Eye barrel cover, a Sears & Roebuck standing hair dryer, some purple glass, a c.1785 Irish mahogany chair, a porcelain doll by Swarovski in a case, a  Robinhood Ware tray, & much more. If you've liked my facebook page, then you're automatically entered into the drawing for the item I select as Best in the Mall. Gary
    Apr 18, 2018 22
  • 23 Mar 2018
    Cranberry Glass is not just for Thanksgiving. Although red “cranberry glass” has been known to exist since early Roman times, it is believed that what we know today as Cranberry Glass was first made by Antonio Neri in 1612 A.D.   That is when he first added a bit of gold to molten glass to produce the red cranberry color. By the mid 1800’s, glass blowers frequently added gold chloride to the molten glass to produce the brilliant red colors in glass. The art of glass blowing soon was able to produce all types of cranberry glass objects including pitchers, vases, decanters and matching glass ware, and even lamps and lamp shades.   During the 1800’s in the United States, several well-known glass companies began mass-producing cranberry glass items. Among these were Pilgrim Glass and Fenton Glass, each of which sold their cranberry glass items in department and gift stores up until discontinuing operations in the early 2000’s. Today cranberry glass items are mostly produced only by individual glass blowers. Items of cranberry glass are becoming more and more scarce and the older items keep increasing in value.   The next time you are in The Brass Armadillo, be sure to keep your eye out for items made of cranberry glass. Remember when you see a piece of sparkling red cranberry glass, there is an extraordinary history, craftsmanship, and a “touch of gold” in that beautiful color.    
    128 Posted by Betty Jean Shearin
  • Cranberry Glass is not just for Thanksgiving. Although red “cranberry glass” has been known to exist since early Roman times, it is believed that what we know today as Cranberry Glass was first made by Antonio Neri in 1612 A.D.   That is when he first added a bit of gold to molten glass to produce the red cranberry color. By the mid 1800’s, glass blowers frequently added gold chloride to the molten glass to produce the brilliant red colors in glass. The art of glass blowing soon was able to produce all types of cranberry glass objects including pitchers, vases, decanters and matching glass ware, and even lamps and lamp shades.   During the 1800’s in the United States, several well-known glass companies began mass-producing cranberry glass items. Among these were Pilgrim Glass and Fenton Glass, each of which sold their cranberry glass items in department and gift stores up until discontinuing operations in the early 2000’s. Today cranberry glass items are mostly produced only by individual glass blowers. Items of cranberry glass are becoming more and more scarce and the older items keep increasing in value.   The next time you are in The Brass Armadillo, be sure to keep your eye out for items made of cranberry glass. Remember when you see a piece of sparkling red cranberry glass, there is an extraordinary history, craftsmanship, and a “touch of gold” in that beautiful color.    
    Mar 23, 2018 128
  • 19 Mar 2018
    "Turn of the Century"--a very broad term to describe everything between Victorian and the '20's. In this week's program we'll examine pieces made during the Art Nouveau, Arts & Crafts, Edwardian, Fin de Siecle, Jugendstil, Modernismo periods. It was a time of great scientific and industrial advancement: we'll look at a Kahn & Bros parlor stove possibly designed by Rudolph Thiem, a spool cabinet made by Merrrick Thread Co, a Loetz vase, a 40 drawer store hardward cabinet made by A. R. Brown of Irwin, Tennessee, and many more representative examples. Please join us this coming Sunday evening, March 25, 2018, at 5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT. Gary
    141 Posted by Gary & Carol Stover
  • "Turn of the Century"--a very broad term to describe everything between Victorian and the '20's. In this week's program we'll examine pieces made during the Art Nouveau, Arts & Crafts, Edwardian, Fin de Siecle, Jugendstil, Modernismo periods. It was a time of great scientific and industrial advancement: we'll look at a Kahn & Bros parlor stove possibly designed by Rudolph Thiem, a spool cabinet made by Merrrick Thread Co, a Loetz vase, a 40 drawer store hardward cabinet made by A. R. Brown of Irwin, Tennessee, and many more representative examples. Please join us this coming Sunday evening, March 25, 2018, at 5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT. Gary
    Mar 19, 2018 141
  • 13 Mar 2018
    Heywood Brothers was established in 1826, Wakefield Company in 1855, and they merged in 1897. In the beginning it was mainly wicker furniture and accessories, but nowadays Heywood-Wakefield is mainly known for its midcentury modern blond furniture, in wheat or champagne. In this week's program we'll look at a few wicker pieces, but primarily we'll examine the midcentury furniture: a corner bookcase, a 9 drawer dresser with mirror, a headboard, and a 2-tier side table; and we'll compare the HW pieces with other pieces of midcentury furniture. I think you'll see why there's a premium for Heywood-Wakefield. We'll be on at the usual time, this coming Sunday evening, March 18, 2018: 5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT. Hope you can join us! Gary
    155 Posted by Gary & Carol Stover
  • Heywood Brothers was established in 1826, Wakefield Company in 1855, and they merged in 1897. In the beginning it was mainly wicker furniture and accessories, but nowadays Heywood-Wakefield is mainly known for its midcentury modern blond furniture, in wheat or champagne. In this week's program we'll look at a few wicker pieces, but primarily we'll examine the midcentury furniture: a corner bookcase, a 9 drawer dresser with mirror, a headboard, and a 2-tier side table; and we'll compare the HW pieces with other pieces of midcentury furniture. I think you'll see why there's a premium for Heywood-Wakefield. We'll be on at the usual time, this coming Sunday evening, March 18, 2018: 5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT. Hope you can join us! Gary
    Mar 13, 2018 155
  • 07 Mar 2018
    This month's Bargain Show at the Brass Armadillo Antique Mall in Denver will highlight Bennington pottery with a Rockingham glaze, an 1820's mahogany arm chair, a c.1800 child's chair with wicker seat, a huge advertising collectible, some German porcelain, a limited edition print, a map from a 1579 atlas, and a few other pieces, all bargains, and all priced at under $100. If you've liked by Facebook page, then you're automatically entered into a drawing for the item I select as the best bargain in the Mall. Please join us this coming Sunday evening, March 11, 2018, for this month's Bargain Show. We'll be on at the usual time: 5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT. Hope to see you then. Gary
    208 Posted by Gary & Carol Stover
  • This month's Bargain Show at the Brass Armadillo Antique Mall in Denver will highlight Bennington pottery with a Rockingham glaze, an 1820's mahogany arm chair, a c.1800 child's chair with wicker seat, a huge advertising collectible, some German porcelain, a limited edition print, a map from a 1579 atlas, and a few other pieces, all bargains, and all priced at under $100. If you've liked by Facebook page, then you're automatically entered into a drawing for the item I select as the best bargain in the Mall. Please join us this coming Sunday evening, March 11, 2018, for this month's Bargain Show. We'll be on at the usual time: 5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT. Hope to see you then. Gary
    Mar 07, 2018 208
  • 01 Mar 2018
    Stephanie Davidson (you know her from Reel Design) joins me for this week's program on how the antiques business can make effective use of all the new Social Media tools. This is NOT an easy subject! There are such wide choices, difficult decisions to make on how to spend your time and money, and on a practical level it's still really more art than science. We're all still feeling our way on how to employ Facebook Live effectively, deciding whether to use Instagram or Pinterest or both, how to incorporate videos with still photos, how to reach our intended audience but not overburden them with redundant content. Stephanie's been doing this for a long time, and she's got some great ideas about what to emphasize and what not to emphasize. This is only the beginning of a conversation that we at iAntique and the Brass Armadillo Antique Malls and everyone else in the industry is having. Please join us this coming Sunday evening, March 4, 2018, for this week's show on Social Media for the Antiques Industry. We're on at the usual time: 5PM PST, 6PM MST, 7PM CST, 8PM EST. Gary
    219 Posted by Gary & Carol Stover
  • Stephanie Davidson (you know her from Reel Design) joins me for this week's program on how the antiques business can make effective use of all the new Social Media tools. This is NOT an easy subject! There are such wide choices, difficult decisions to make on how to spend your time and money, and on a practical level it's still really more art than science. We're all still feeling our way on how to employ Facebook Live effectively, deciding whether to use Instagram or Pinterest or both, how to incorporate videos with still photos, how to reach our intended audience but not overburden them with redundant content. Stephanie's been doing this for a long time, and she's got some great ideas about what to emphasize and what not to emphasize. This is only the beginning of a conversation that we at iAntique and the Brass Armadillo Antique Malls and everyone else in the industry is having. Please join us this coming Sunday evening, March 4, 2018, for this week's show on Social Media for the Antiques Industry. We're on at the usual time: 5PM PST, 6PM MST, 7PM CST, 8PM EST. Gary
    Mar 01, 2018 219
  • 19 Jul 2010
    Here is  a Slight history on insulators, pertains mainly to the glass variety, to see a full history please feel free to visit http://www.nia.org/timeline/index.htm where I found the following facts from. May 24, 1844:  Samuel Morse transmitted the first telegraph message over a short telegraph line run along a railroad between Washington, D.C. and Baltimore with the famous words "What hath god wrought!".  Based on advice from Ezra Cornell, the insulators used on this line were made of two flat glass plates surrounding a cloth wrapped wire in slot in the crossarm. April 18, 1846: Royal E. House of New York, NY patent for a telegraph that prints characters to be decoded titled "The Magnetic Letter Printing Telegraph".  The idea was different enough from Morse's design to avoid infringement.  An unusual metal and glass insulator was developed uniquely for the House telegraph.  (US Patent 4,464) July 24, 1846:  Addison Smith of Perrysburg, OH patent for a fire detector and alarm system using telegraph to transmit information.  (US Patent 4,661) April 5, 1848:  Ralph Gray and Robert Hemingray signed a five year lease for a small half-lot on Hammond Street (originally known as  Mayor's Alley from Third to Fourth, between Main and Sycamore) in Cincinnati, Ohio.  They soon began manufacturing glass at this location under the name of Gray & Hemingray Glass Works. February 5, 1850:  James Spratt of Cincinnati, OH patent for a lightning rod insulator design.  This patent was implemented in an early LRI (Lightning Rod Insulator).  (US Patent 7,076) October 14, 1851:  John Yandell of  St. Louis, MO  patent for a glass block insulator.  A good example of this CD 1014 insulator exists in the Smithsonian Institution archives.  (US Patent 8,438) -- [Full Patent Text] March 29, 1859:  Russel Hickok of Fort Edward, NY patent for a glass lightning rod insulator design.  Link for more details! (US Patent 23,373) -- [Full Patent Text] August 5, 1861: The Transcontinental Telegraph, which connected St. Joseph, Missouri and Sacramento, was completed by the Western Union Telegraph Co. and its associates.  In 1869 this line was rerouted to follow the Transcontinental Rail Road July 25, 1865:  This important patent was by Louis Cauvet for the a method of forming internal threads an insulators to allow them to screw onto a threaded pin.  Previous insulators were threadless and held on the pin by friction. Brookfield was the first to license this patent.  (US Patent 48,906) -- [Full Patent Text] December 19, 1871:  Robert Hemingray patent for a technique for molding glass insulators.  This patent was used on a very large variety of insulators.  (US Patent 122,015) -- [Full Patent Text] -- (Additional Patent Image) January 23, 1872:  Chester H. Pond of Cleveland, OH patent for a threaded wooden insulator with a metal cap.  Several excellent examples of these insulators can be found in the Smithsonian archives.  (US Patent 122,961) -- [Full Patent Text] February 6, 1877:  Paul Seiler patent to provide six longitudinal ribs to both strengthen the insulator without adding weight and reduce the contact area with the tie wire.  This patent was implemented in CD 130.2.  (US Patent 187,183) -- [Full Patent Text] January 14, 1879:  James M. Brookfield design patent for the CD 102 "pony" style insulator.  (US Design Patent 10,981) -- [Full Patent Text] September 13, 1881:  Samuel Oakman patent for a process of forming threads on an insulator by plunging a previously formed (and cool) threaded glass cup into the molton glass in the mold.  The glass would cool enough as to not overly distort the threaded cup.  This technique was used by the American Insulator Co. on many of their insulators as well as some unembossed pieces and a CD 134 marked with just the patent.  This is the reason that many of these pieces have poorly defined or somewhat distorted threads, as the glass cup would soften in the molton glass.  (US Patent 247,100) -- [Full Patent Text] May 1, 1883:  Joseph S. Lewis patent for an external thread above the wire groove to allow the insulator to be "screwed in" to a tie wire.  a damaged insulator could also be replaced without undoing the tie wire.  The patent drawing shows the threading to be in the same direction as a normal insulator's internal threads, making one loosen it on the pin to attach the tie wire (Not a desirable function).  Frank Pope's patent later this same year (Dec. 25, 1883) is for virtually the same design, only threaded in the opposite direction.  Both patents appear on the National Insulator "Corkscrew" styles CD 110.5 and 110.6.  (US Patent 276,839) -- [Full Patent Text] August 14, 1883:  Homer Brooke, of Jersey City, NJ patent for an insulator press.  This patent was implemented on a number of Brooke's insulators including CD 120 and 133.1 and it is likely that this is the "patent applied for" on a number of other styles attributed to Homer Brooke including CD 120.2 and CD 125. Thanks to Bob Stahr for providing this data originating from Dick Roller who put together a great reference data base. (US Patent 283,321) -- [Full Patent Text] -- Link to additional Homer Brooke information. October 16, 1883:  Bradley A. Fiske and Samuel D. Mott patent for diamond shaped indentations in the wire groove to reduce electrical contact with the tie wire.  This patent was implemented in both CD 135 and CD 109.  (US Patent 286,801) -- [Full Patent Text] December 25, 1883:  Frank L. Pope patent for external threads opposed to the internal to allow the replacement of a broken insulator without disturbing the tie wire.  This patent was implemented in CD 110.5 and CD 110.6. (US Patent 290,922) -- [Full Patent Text] June 24, 1886:  The pottery & Glassware Reporter was informed by Mr. E. A. Leonard that the Leonard Glass Works of Detroit, Mich., has closed down and may not be reopened August 17, 1886:   John O'Brian of New York, NY patent for a unique insulator design assigned to William Brookfield.   This patent was implemented in the Brookfield CD 119 insulators, although the embossing provides the wrong patent date.   (US Patent 347,635) -- [Full Patent Text] November 23, 1886:  Robert G. Brown of Brooklyn, NY assigned to the E.S.Greeley & Co. patent for an insulator and pin to allow mounting below the crossarm.  This design could double the number of circuits supported by a single crossarm or be used to facilitate wire transposition.  This patent style is known as the "Brown Pony" and was implemented in CD 187 & CD 188 as well as U-81, U-82, U-84 and U-85.  (US Patent 353,120) -- [Full Patent Text] November 8, 1887:  Francis H. Soden and Henry Goehst patent for a strain insulator for electric lights.  This patent was implemented in the CD 1129 glass strain. (US Patent 372,940) -- [Full Patent Text] June 17, 1890:  Samuel Oakmen patent for the ears found on cable insulators - CD 258, CD 259, and CD 260 match closely the patent drawings.  (US Patent 430,296) -- [Full Patent Text] August 19, 1890:  Samuel Oakman for a skirt projection to act as a water stop as well as threading the inside of the inner skirt to increase the leakage distance.  This was implemented in CD 258, CD 259, and CD 260.  (US Patent 434,879) -- [Full Patent Text] December 23, 1890:  Foree Bain patent for grooves inside and outside the insulator surface for the dual purpose of increasing leakage distance.   This has been implemented on CD 144.  This patent was assigned to the Hemingray Glass Company on February 28th, 1901. (US Patent 443,187) -- [Full Patent Text] February 1891:  Pass and Seymour of Syracuse, NY starts making threaded porcelain "wet process" insulators.  The only known existing style they made is U-146, although they also catalogued U-141.  Sometime in 1895 or 1896 they stopped making pintype insulators. May 2, 1893: Ralph G. Hemingray patented drip points.  The intent was to provide a point for moisture to accumulate and more quickly drip off the insulator keeping it dryer.  This date is considered significant as drip points were so widely implemented.  (US Patent 496,652) -- [Full Patent Text] August 29, 1893:  George W. Blackburn of Palmyra, NJ patented an insulator design using a bail clamp to hold the conductor wire.  This patent was implemented in CD 141.6 (US Patent 504,059) -- [Full Patent Text] August 14, 1894:  George H. Winslow of Pittsburgh Pennsylvania patent for a unique series of oil cup insulators for high voltage use.  This patent appears to have been implemented in several rare insulator styles including  CD 180, CD 180.1 and CD 244.  (US Patent 524,659) -- [Full Patent Text] -- (Additional Patent Image). September 25, 1894:  David N. Osyor patent for a pin and insulator combination that was assigned to the Jeffery Mfg. Co.  This was implemented in the CD 185 Mine insulator and porcelain U-89 through U-98B.  (US Patent 526,498) -- [Full Patent Text] 1895: The first underground trolley system in the United States is constructed in Boston, MA.  This system used relatively low voltage DC which required very large copper cables.  The CD 140 "Jumbo" was designed for this line. September 3, 1895:  Danial Rothenberger patent for a unique cable style insulator with a hole through the crown perpendicular to the tie wire.  This patent was implemented in the rare Brookfield CD 268.  (US Patent 545,819) -- [Full Patent Text] February 12, 1896: "China Glass & Lamps" reports the new glass works being erected at Westport, Md., by the Baltimore Glass Mfg. Co., is nearing completion.  Later reports show production started by the end of March making Screw cap ware, fruit jars and electrical supplies. -- Their insulators are marked B.G.M.Co. and are mostly found in purple glass. April 7, 1896:  Hannibal W. Rappleye patent for a bail-clamp tie arrangement to hold the conductor.  This patent was implemented by Brookfield in the rare CD 134.6 (US Patent 557,881) -- [Full Patent Text] September 28, 1897:  Fred Locke patent for a power insulator with an oblong shape and side troughs to direct water away from splashing on the crossarm.  This patent was implemented in the U-937 insulators that Locke had Imperial Porcelain make for use on the Niagara to Buffalo power line.  (US Patent 590,806) -- [Full Patent Text] March 8, 1898:  John W. Boch patent for a three piece porcelain power insulator where the three shells were fused together with extra glaze.  This was implemented in the Classic Thomas styles U-928 and U-928A.  (US Patent 600,475) -- [Full Patent Text] June 7, 1898:  Ralph D. Mershon of Colorado patent covering a power insulator design with a far extended inner petticoat and ridges on the top skirt to direct water off the insulator.  This patent was implemented in CD 288 and CD 298 as well as U-938, U-944 and U-945.  (US Patent 605,256) -- [Full Patent Text] September 3, 1898: A British patent by Daniel Sinclair and William Aitken both of Oxford Court, London patent for a two part dry spot insulator implemented in U-1925,U-1929, and U-1929A. (UK Patent 25,816 of 1897) -- [Full Patent Text] September 19, 1899:  Frederick H. Withycombe of Montreal, Canada patent  for a various ridge designs on the outside of an insulator to provide a "cushion" to damage from projectiles (ie: thrown rocks).  This first patent illustrates horizontal ridges.  He released four very similar Letters Patents and two design patents for virtually the same ideas.    Horizontal ridges are found on a number of Canadian CD 143's.  (US Patent 633,173) -- [Full Patent Text] 1900:  An eight mile elevated section of Boston's transit system was constructed.  Heavy DC cables were required and this line used CD 267 and CD 267.5 insulators without tie wires.  The weight of the cable was sufficient to hold it in place below  the tracks. June 10, 1902:  Vernon G. Converse patent for a stacking insulator.  This patent was implemented in the amazing glass insulator comprising CD 317.8, two CD 313 sleeves, and one CD 313.1 sleeve.  (US Patent 701,847) -- [Full Patent Text] April 7, 1903:  Ferdinand W. Gregory of New York, NY patent for a square wire groove providing extra support for the conductor.  This was implemented on the scarce Brookfield CD 159.    (US Patent 724,848) -- [Full Patent Text] May 19, 1903:  Fred M. Locke patent for the design of the M-2795 insulator.  (US Patent 728,805) -- [Full Patent Text] November 17, 1903:  Edward F. Schoethaler of Longbranch, NJ patent for a unique insulator design.  The drawings look very similar to the recently found "Spaceman" CD - The intent was to provide extra protection from a wire coming undone which may indicate that this idea influenced  the rare CD 139 Brookfield "Combination Safety" insulator.  (US Patent 744,631) -- [Full Patent Text] April 26, 1904: Scott Cutter patents the unusual CD 1038 glass Cutter tree insulator. (US Patent 758,175) -- [Full Patent Text] March 24, 1908:  Leonard W. Storror of San Francisco, CA patent for an insulator with an insert to improve insulation by making a better barrier to moisture.  This was implemented in the Brookfield CD 211 "No Leak" insulator.  (US Patent 882,803) -- [Full Patent Text] April 6, 1909: Charles E. Eveleth of Schenectady, NY patent for a porcelain power insulators with skirt grooves to allow pieces to break off if hit by a projectile preventing the loss of the whole insulator.  This patent was implemented in the rare M-2202 and M-2202A porcelain power insulators.  (US Patent 917,031) -- [Full Patent Text] March 19, 1910: The Hemingray Glass Company received Trade Mark No. 79,096: “HEMINGRAY” for use on ‘electric, telegraph, telephone, cable, street-railway, and floor insulators and break-knobs of glass.’ It was noted that the trade mark had been in use for 10 years.  Link for additional Hemingray information. January 16, 1912:  John Hilliard Jr. and Charles E. Parsons of Glens Falls, NY patent for a unique rigid suspension insulator made with multiple insulating shells mounted on a rod with two metal ends.  This is quite likely the patent for the recently found suspension insulators made from five CD 314 Hemingray shells.  (US Patent 1,015,229) -- [Full Patent Text] August 11, 1914:  Benjiman S. Purkey of Tacoma, WA patent for a twist lock "No Tie" porcelain insulator.  This patent is implemented in U-186.  Although unmarked, the recently discovered CD 207.5 may also have been made to this patent.  (US Patent 1,107,111) -- [Full Patent Text] Sept. 18, 1917:  Louis Fort of Jersey City, N.J. patent for a porcelain and metal two piece clamp insulator for street light drops.  These unusual insulators were made in brown porcelain with a cast metal clamp and mounting. (US Patent 1,240,330) -- [Full Patent Text] February 26, 1929:  Rufus Gould of New York, NY patent for a dry spot insulator assigned to the Postal Telegraph Co.  This patent was implemented in Whitall Tatum CD 182 and porcelain styles U-173, U-174, and U-175.  It called for a large inner skirt gap where the drop wire could be potted to keep wetness out.  (US Patent 1,703,853) -- [Full Patent Text] April 9, 1929:  Leon T. Wilson of East Orange, NJ assigned to A.T.& T. CO.  patent for a low loss glass insulator design.  This patent was implemented in Whitall Tatum CD 176 and the recently discovered Hemingray version CD-176.5.  (US Patent 1,708,038) -- [Full Patent Text] June 22, 1937:  Bentley A. Plimpton of Victor, NY patent for a porcelain high voltage insulator with additional petticoats and flanges.  This patent was implemented in the porcelain "Hi-Top" series of insulators (U-782 through U-805) as well as glass styles CD 220 and CD 221.  (US Patent 2,084,866) -- [Full Patent Text] November 16, 1937: Donald H. Smith assigned to the Western Union Telegraph Co. patent for a metal insulator shield to go around the base of a CD 154 style insulator.  I have seen these in use on Canadian dominion CD 154's.  (US Patent 2,099,540) -- [Full Patent Text] July 11, 1939:  H.H. Wheeler assigned to Western Union Telegraph Co.  patent for a low loss telegraph insulator.  This patent was implemented in CD 122.4 by Corning and Hemingray.  Of more interest, this patent covers the carnival glass coating used on many of the telegraph styles including the CD 118, 142 and 142.4.  It states that the coating increased the surface resistance of the insulator, thereby improving its performance in damp weather. (US Patent 2,165,773) -- [Full Patent Text] October 15, 1940:  D.H. Smith of the Western Union Telegraph Co. patent for a threaded rubber insulator.  This patent was implemented in the smaller Continental Rubber Works insulators.  (US Patent 2,218,497) -- [Full Patent Text] January 8, 1946:  Alwin G. Steinmayer of Milwaukee, WI patent for a combination insulator and spark gap arrestor.  This patent was assigned to the Line Material Company and was implemented in Hemingray insulator CD 186.1 and CD 186 and CD 186.2 were likely similar experimental pieces.  (US Patent 2,392,342) -- [Full Patent Text] November 30, 1948:  Rogers Case patented a mid-span transposition bracket as used with the Owens Illinois CD 1049 insulators.  (US Patent 2,455,229) -- [Full Patent Text] October 30, 1962:  William F. Markley and James L. Slater patent covering the design of several insulator styles made of rubber.  This patent was assigned to the Western Union Telegraph Co.  Several styles made by the Continental Rubber Works match this patent.  (US Patent 3,061,667) -- [Full Patent Text]
    149847 Posted by Christina Errington
  • Here is  a Slight history on insulators, pertains mainly to the glass variety, to see a full history please feel free to visit http://www.nia.org/timeline/index.htm where I found the following facts from. May 24, 1844:  Samuel Morse transmitted the first telegraph message over a short telegraph line run along a railroad between Washington, D.C. and Baltimore with the famous words "What hath god wrought!".  Based on advice from Ezra Cornell, the insulators used on this line were made of two flat glass plates surrounding a cloth wrapped wire in slot in the crossarm. April 18, 1846: Royal E. House of New York, NY patent for a telegraph that prints characters to be decoded titled "The Magnetic Letter Printing Telegraph".  The idea was different enough from Morse's design to avoid infringement.  An unusual metal and glass insulator was developed uniquely for the House telegraph.  (US Patent 4,464) July 24, 1846:  Addison Smith of Perrysburg, OH patent for a fire detector and alarm system using telegraph to transmit information.  (US Patent 4,661) April 5, 1848:  Ralph Gray and Robert Hemingray signed a five year lease for a small half-lot on Hammond Street (originally known as  Mayor's Alley from Third to Fourth, between Main and Sycamore) in Cincinnati, Ohio.  They soon began manufacturing glass at this location under the name of Gray & Hemingray Glass Works. February 5, 1850:  James Spratt of Cincinnati, OH patent for a lightning rod insulator design.  This patent was implemented in an early LRI (Lightning Rod Insulator).  (US Patent 7,076) October 14, 1851:  John Yandell of  St. Louis, MO  patent for a glass block insulator.  A good example of this CD 1014 insulator exists in the Smithsonian Institution archives.  (US Patent 8,438) -- [Full Patent Text] March 29, 1859:  Russel Hickok of Fort Edward, NY patent for a glass lightning rod insulator design.  Link for more details! (US Patent 23,373) -- [Full Patent Text] August 5, 1861: The Transcontinental Telegraph, which connected St. Joseph, Missouri and Sacramento, was completed by the Western Union Telegraph Co. and its associates.  In 1869 this line was rerouted to follow the Transcontinental Rail Road July 25, 1865:  This important patent was by Louis Cauvet for the a method of forming internal threads an insulators to allow them to screw onto a threaded pin.  Previous insulators were threadless and held on the pin by friction. Brookfield was the first to license this patent.  (US Patent 48,906) -- [Full Patent Text] December 19, 1871:  Robert Hemingray patent for a technique for molding glass insulators.  This patent was used on a very large variety of insulators.  (US Patent 122,015) -- [Full Patent Text] -- (Additional Patent Image) January 23, 1872:  Chester H. Pond of Cleveland, OH patent for a threaded wooden insulator with a metal cap.  Several excellent examples of these insulators can be found in the Smithsonian archives.  (US Patent 122,961) -- [Full Patent Text] February 6, 1877:  Paul Seiler patent to provide six longitudinal ribs to both strengthen the insulator without adding weight and reduce the contact area with the tie wire.  This patent was implemented in CD 130.2.  (US Patent 187,183) -- [Full Patent Text] January 14, 1879:  James M. Brookfield design patent for the CD 102 "pony" style insulator.  (US Design Patent 10,981) -- [Full Patent Text] September 13, 1881:  Samuel Oakman patent for a process of forming threads on an insulator by plunging a previously formed (and cool) threaded glass cup into the molton glass in the mold.  The glass would cool enough as to not overly distort the threaded cup.  This technique was used by the American Insulator Co. on many of their insulators as well as some unembossed pieces and a CD 134 marked with just the patent.  This is the reason that many of these pieces have poorly defined or somewhat distorted threads, as the glass cup would soften in the molton glass.  (US Patent 247,100) -- [Full Patent Text] May 1, 1883:  Joseph S. Lewis patent for an external thread above the wire groove to allow the insulator to be "screwed in" to a tie wire.  a damaged insulator could also be replaced without undoing the tie wire.  The patent drawing shows the threading to be in the same direction as a normal insulator's internal threads, making one loosen it on the pin to attach the tie wire (Not a desirable function).  Frank Pope's patent later this same year (Dec. 25, 1883) is for virtually the same design, only threaded in the opposite direction.  Both patents appear on the National Insulator "Corkscrew" styles CD 110.5 and 110.6.  (US Patent 276,839) -- [Full Patent Text] August 14, 1883:  Homer Brooke, of Jersey City, NJ patent for an insulator press.  This patent was implemented on a number of Brooke's insulators including CD 120 and 133.1 and it is likely that this is the "patent applied for" on a number of other styles attributed to Homer Brooke including CD 120.2 and CD 125. Thanks to Bob Stahr for providing this data originating from Dick Roller who put together a great reference data base. (US Patent 283,321) -- [Full Patent Text] -- Link to additional Homer Brooke information. October 16, 1883:  Bradley A. Fiske and Samuel D. Mott patent for diamond shaped indentations in the wire groove to reduce electrical contact with the tie wire.  This patent was implemented in both CD 135 and CD 109.  (US Patent 286,801) -- [Full Patent Text] December 25, 1883:  Frank L. Pope patent for external threads opposed to the internal to allow the replacement of a broken insulator without disturbing the tie wire.  This patent was implemented in CD 110.5 and CD 110.6. (US Patent 290,922) -- [Full Patent Text] June 24, 1886:  The pottery & Glassware Reporter was informed by Mr. E. A. Leonard that the Leonard Glass Works of Detroit, Mich., has closed down and may not be reopened August 17, 1886:   John O'Brian of New York, NY patent for a unique insulator design assigned to William Brookfield.   This patent was implemented in the Brookfield CD 119 insulators, although the embossing provides the wrong patent date.   (US Patent 347,635) -- [Full Patent Text] November 23, 1886:  Robert G. Brown of Brooklyn, NY assigned to the E.S.Greeley & Co. patent for an insulator and pin to allow mounting below the crossarm.  This design could double the number of circuits supported by a single crossarm or be used to facilitate wire transposition.  This patent style is known as the "Brown Pony" and was implemented in CD 187 & CD 188 as well as U-81, U-82, U-84 and U-85.  (US Patent 353,120) -- [Full Patent Text] November 8, 1887:  Francis H. Soden and Henry Goehst patent for a strain insulator for electric lights.  This patent was implemented in the CD 1129 glass strain. (US Patent 372,940) -- [Full Patent Text] June 17, 1890:  Samuel Oakmen patent for the ears found on cable insulators - CD 258, CD 259, and CD 260 match closely the patent drawings.  (US Patent 430,296) -- [Full Patent Text] August 19, 1890:  Samuel Oakman for a skirt projection to act as a water stop as well as threading the inside of the inner skirt to increase the leakage distance.  This was implemented in CD 258, CD 259, and CD 260.  (US Patent 434,879) -- [Full Patent Text] December 23, 1890:  Foree Bain patent for grooves inside and outside the insulator surface for the dual purpose of increasing leakage distance.   This has been implemented on CD 144.  This patent was assigned to the Hemingray Glass Company on February 28th, 1901. (US Patent 443,187) -- [Full Patent Text] February 1891:  Pass and Seymour of Syracuse, NY starts making threaded porcelain "wet process" insulators.  The only known existing style they made is U-146, although they also catalogued U-141.  Sometime in 1895 or 1896 they stopped making pintype insulators. May 2, 1893: Ralph G. Hemingray patented drip points.  The intent was to provide a point for moisture to accumulate and more quickly drip off the insulator keeping it dryer.  This date is considered significant as drip points were so widely implemented.  (US Patent 496,652) -- [Full Patent Text] August 29, 1893:  George W. Blackburn of Palmyra, NJ patented an insulator design using a bail clamp to hold the conductor wire.  This patent was implemented in CD 141.6 (US Patent 504,059) -- [Full Patent Text] August 14, 1894:  George H. Winslow of Pittsburgh Pennsylvania patent for a unique series of oil cup insulators for high voltage use.  This patent appears to have been implemented in several rare insulator styles including  CD 180, CD 180.1 and CD 244.  (US Patent 524,659) -- [Full Patent Text] -- (Additional Patent Image). September 25, 1894:  David N. Osyor patent for a pin and insulator combination that was assigned to the Jeffery Mfg. Co.  This was implemented in the CD 185 Mine insulator and porcelain U-89 through U-98B.  (US Patent 526,498) -- [Full Patent Text] 1895: The first underground trolley system in the United States is constructed in Boston, MA.  This system used relatively low voltage DC which required very large copper cables.  The CD 140 "Jumbo" was designed for this line. September 3, 1895:  Danial Rothenberger patent for a unique cable style insulator with a hole through the crown perpendicular to the tie wire.  This patent was implemented in the rare Brookfield CD 268.  (US Patent 545,819) -- [Full Patent Text] February 12, 1896: "China Glass & Lamps" reports the new glass works being erected at Westport, Md., by the Baltimore Glass Mfg. Co., is nearing completion.  Later reports show production started by the end of March making Screw cap ware, fruit jars and electrical supplies. -- Their insulators are marked B.G.M.Co. and are mostly found in purple glass. April 7, 1896:  Hannibal W. Rappleye patent for a bail-clamp tie arrangement to hold the conductor.  This patent was implemented by Brookfield in the rare CD 134.6 (US Patent 557,881) -- [Full Patent Text] September 28, 1897:  Fred Locke patent for a power insulator with an oblong shape and side troughs to direct water away from splashing on the crossarm.  This patent was implemented in the U-937 insulators that Locke had Imperial Porcelain make for use on the Niagara to Buffalo power line.  (US Patent 590,806) -- [Full Patent Text] March 8, 1898:  John W. Boch patent for a three piece porcelain power insulator where the three shells were fused together with extra glaze.  This was implemented in the Classic Thomas styles U-928 and U-928A.  (US Patent 600,475) -- [Full Patent Text] June 7, 1898:  Ralph D. Mershon of Colorado patent covering a power insulator design with a far extended inner petticoat and ridges on the top skirt to direct water off the insulator.  This patent was implemented in CD 288 and CD 298 as well as U-938, U-944 and U-945.  (US Patent 605,256) -- [Full Patent Text] September 3, 1898: A British patent by Daniel Sinclair and William Aitken both of Oxford Court, London patent for a two part dry spot insulator implemented in U-1925,U-1929, and U-1929A. (UK Patent 25,816 of 1897) -- [Full Patent Text] September 19, 1899:  Frederick H. Withycombe of Montreal, Canada patent  for a various ridge designs on the outside of an insulator to provide a "cushion" to damage from projectiles (ie: thrown rocks).  This first patent illustrates horizontal ridges.  He released four very similar Letters Patents and two design patents for virtually the same ideas.    Horizontal ridges are found on a number of Canadian CD 143's.  (US Patent 633,173) -- [Full Patent Text] 1900:  An eight mile elevated section of Boston's transit system was constructed.  Heavy DC cables were required and this line used CD 267 and CD 267.5 insulators without tie wires.  The weight of the cable was sufficient to hold it in place below  the tracks. June 10, 1902:  Vernon G. Converse patent for a stacking insulator.  This patent was implemented in the amazing glass insulator comprising CD 317.8, two CD 313 sleeves, and one CD 313.1 sleeve.  (US Patent 701,847) -- [Full Patent Text] April 7, 1903:  Ferdinand W. Gregory of New York, NY patent for a square wire groove providing extra support for the conductor.  This was implemented on the scarce Brookfield CD 159.    (US Patent 724,848) -- [Full Patent Text] May 19, 1903:  Fred M. Locke patent for the design of the M-2795 insulator.  (US Patent 728,805) -- [Full Patent Text] November 17, 1903:  Edward F. Schoethaler of Longbranch, NJ patent for a unique insulator design.  The drawings look very similar to the recently found "Spaceman" CD - The intent was to provide extra protection from a wire coming undone which may indicate that this idea influenced  the rare CD 139 Brookfield "Combination Safety" insulator.  (US Patent 744,631) -- [Full Patent Text] April 26, 1904: Scott Cutter patents the unusual CD 1038 glass Cutter tree insulator. (US Patent 758,175) -- [Full Patent Text] March 24, 1908:  Leonard W. Storror of San Francisco, CA patent for an insulator with an insert to improve insulation by making a better barrier to moisture.  This was implemented in the Brookfield CD 211 "No Leak" insulator.  (US Patent 882,803) -- [Full Patent Text] April 6, 1909: Charles E. Eveleth of Schenectady, NY patent for a porcelain power insulators with skirt grooves to allow pieces to break off if hit by a projectile preventing the loss of the whole insulator.  This patent was implemented in the rare M-2202 and M-2202A porcelain power insulators.  (US Patent 917,031) -- [Full Patent Text] March 19, 1910: The Hemingray Glass Company received Trade Mark No. 79,096: “HEMINGRAY” for use on ‘electric, telegraph, telephone, cable, street-railway, and floor insulators and break-knobs of glass.’ It was noted that the trade mark had been in use for 10 years.  Link for additional Hemingray information. January 16, 1912:  John Hilliard Jr. and Charles E. Parsons of Glens Falls, NY patent for a unique rigid suspension insulator made with multiple insulating shells mounted on a rod with two metal ends.  This is quite likely the patent for the recently found suspension insulators made from five CD 314 Hemingray shells.  (US Patent 1,015,229) -- [Full Patent Text] August 11, 1914:  Benjiman S. Purkey of Tacoma, WA patent for a twist lock "No Tie" porcelain insulator.  This patent is implemented in U-186.  Although unmarked, the recently discovered CD 207.5 may also have been made to this patent.  (US Patent 1,107,111) -- [Full Patent Text] Sept. 18, 1917:  Louis Fort of Jersey City, N.J. patent for a porcelain and metal two piece clamp insulator for street light drops.  These unusual insulators were made in brown porcelain with a cast metal clamp and mounting. (US Patent 1,240,330) -- [Full Patent Text] February 26, 1929:  Rufus Gould of New York, NY patent for a dry spot insulator assigned to the Postal Telegraph Co.  This patent was implemented in Whitall Tatum CD 182 and porcelain styles U-173, U-174, and U-175.  It called for a large inner skirt gap where the drop wire could be potted to keep wetness out.  (US Patent 1,703,853) -- [Full Patent Text] April 9, 1929:  Leon T. Wilson of East Orange, NJ assigned to A.T.& T. CO.  patent for a low loss glass insulator design.  This patent was implemented in Whitall Tatum CD 176 and the recently discovered Hemingray version CD-176.5.  (US Patent 1,708,038) -- [Full Patent Text] June 22, 1937:  Bentley A. Plimpton of Victor, NY patent for a porcelain high voltage insulator with additional petticoats and flanges.  This patent was implemented in the porcelain "Hi-Top" series of insulators (U-782 through U-805) as well as glass styles CD 220 and CD 221.  (US Patent 2,084,866) -- [Full Patent Text] November 16, 1937: Donald H. Smith assigned to the Western Union Telegraph Co. patent for a metal insulator shield to go around the base of a CD 154 style insulator.  I have seen these in use on Canadian dominion CD 154's.  (US Patent 2,099,540) -- [Full Patent Text] July 11, 1939:  H.H. Wheeler assigned to Western Union Telegraph Co.  patent for a low loss telegraph insulator.  This patent was implemented in CD 122.4 by Corning and Hemingray.  Of more interest, this patent covers the carnival glass coating used on many of the telegraph styles including the CD 118, 142 and 142.4.  It states that the coating increased the surface resistance of the insulator, thereby improving its performance in damp weather. (US Patent 2,165,773) -- [Full Patent Text] October 15, 1940:  D.H. Smith of the Western Union Telegraph Co. patent for a threaded rubber insulator.  This patent was implemented in the smaller Continental Rubber Works insulators.  (US Patent 2,218,497) -- [Full Patent Text] January 8, 1946:  Alwin G. Steinmayer of Milwaukee, WI patent for a combination insulator and spark gap arrestor.  This patent was assigned to the Line Material Company and was implemented in Hemingray insulator CD 186.1 and CD 186 and CD 186.2 were likely similar experimental pieces.  (US Patent 2,392,342) -- [Full Patent Text] November 30, 1948:  Rogers Case patented a mid-span transposition bracket as used with the Owens Illinois CD 1049 insulators.  (US Patent 2,455,229) -- [Full Patent Text] October 30, 1962:  William F. Markley and James L. Slater patent covering the design of several insulator styles made of rubber.  This patent was assigned to the Western Union Telegraph Co.  Several styles made by the Continental Rubber Works match this patent.  (US Patent 3,061,667) -- [Full Patent Text]
    Jul 19, 2010 149847
  • 12 Oct 2012
    There is a frenzy going on amongst the Denver Brass Armadillo Antique Mall venders this week....and as well there should be!   We had more great success with the Classified Listing Program within the Mall.  It brought in some really great sales and got multiple venders excited about getting their own items posted and up on the internet.   Back in May of 2012 a couple of venders came to me and asked me to post an item that they had stored in one of our back rooms.  The item was too large for them to display in their space in the Mall, but depite its size and "unique vibe", we knew that the item would make the right buyer a happy camper....if we could only find them, or better yet, help them find us!     This 1920's antique medical exam table is oak with all the fixings:  2 sets of stir-ups, the original leather, height & foot adjustments,  blood pan and 4 pass through drawers.   The item was originally listed on May 2, 2012 and reposted approximately every 60 days with no success in finding a buyer for this unique item. But just after reposting it at the end of September, a couple of gentlemen came into the Mall and asked us to pull the table out of storage.  They looked it over and happily took it home with them on Wednesday of this last week.    As if this weren't already a great enough story.....    Shortly after I was asked to post the medical exam table, the same set of venders asked if I could come out to their shop and storage unit and list some additional  items that they wanted to sell.  Due to the collectability, rarity & value of the items, I happily obliged.  Again, I continued to repost the items as they expired and just this last Tuesday, after reposting it just two days before, we received a call from an interested buyer for this beautiful quarter sawn oak Early Murphy Bed with desk and beveled mirror.     People, I have seen this happen time and time again.  I'll list an item and nothing happens, but then I'll repost it and we make a connection.  It's all a matter of finding that one person and what better way to do that than by listing your items and being persistent.        Amie Martin Social Networking Coordinator Denver Brass Armadillo Antique Mall
    45054 Posted by Denver Brass Armadillo
  • There is a frenzy going on amongst the Denver Brass Armadillo Antique Mall venders this week....and as well there should be!   We had more great success with the Classified Listing Program within the Mall.  It brought in some really great sales and got multiple venders excited about getting their own items posted and up on the internet.   Back in May of 2012 a couple of venders came to me and asked me to post an item that they had stored in one of our back rooms.  The item was too large for them to display in their space in the Mall, but depite its size and "unique vibe", we knew that the item would make the right buyer a happy camper....if we could only find them, or better yet, help them find us!     This 1920's antique medical exam table is oak with all the fixings:  2 sets of stir-ups, the original leather, height & foot adjustments,  blood pan and 4 pass through drawers.   The item was originally listed on May 2, 2012 and reposted approximately every 60 days with no success in finding a buyer for this unique item. But just after reposting it at the end of September, a couple of gentlemen came into the Mall and asked us to pull the table out of storage.  They looked it over and happily took it home with them on Wednesday of this last week.    As if this weren't already a great enough story.....    Shortly after I was asked to post the medical exam table, the same set of venders asked if I could come out to their shop and storage unit and list some additional  items that they wanted to sell.  Due to the collectability, rarity & value of the items, I happily obliged.  Again, I continued to repost the items as they expired and just this last Tuesday, after reposting it just two days before, we received a call from an interested buyer for this beautiful quarter sawn oak Early Murphy Bed with desk and beveled mirror.     People, I have seen this happen time and time again.  I'll list an item and nothing happens, but then I'll repost it and we make a connection.  It's all a matter of finding that one person and what better way to do that than by listing your items and being persistent.        Amie Martin Social Networking Coordinator Denver Brass Armadillo Antique Mall
    Oct 12, 2012 45054
  • 29 Oct 2010
  • 16 Oct 2014
    This week's show is entitled, "The Importance of Provenance," but maybe it would be better to say "The Joy of Provenance." If you like antiques, you probably enjoy history, and what could be more interesting than researching your own possessions to establish a line of ownership thru the years? So, I've taken a few pieces that I own and some that I see for sale in the Mall, and show how I was or was not able to establish ownership back to when the pieces were made. In every case the attempt was worth the effort, even if the chain is broken in some places. I do this more for myself than for any future owner, but I do think that buyers enjoy knowing the most they can about whatever they buy. I did a show a few years ago entitled, "People Buy Stories," which is in the Videos section, and in it I give a few examples of how histories can give value to objects. Hope you can join us at the usual time on Sunday evening, 5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT for this week's shows. Gary
    20861 Posted by Gary & Carol Stover
  • This week's show is entitled, "The Importance of Provenance," but maybe it would be better to say "The Joy of Provenance." If you like antiques, you probably enjoy history, and what could be more interesting than researching your own possessions to establish a line of ownership thru the years? So, I've taken a few pieces that I own and some that I see for sale in the Mall, and show how I was or was not able to establish ownership back to when the pieces were made. In every case the attempt was worth the effort, even if the chain is broken in some places. I do this more for myself than for any future owner, but I do think that buyers enjoy knowing the most they can about whatever they buy. I did a show a few years ago entitled, "People Buy Stories," which is in the Videos section, and in it I give a few examples of how histories can give value to objects. Hope you can join us at the usual time on Sunday evening, 5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT for this week's shows. Gary
    Oct 16, 2014 20861
  • 31 Aug 2011
    Large sculptures of four famous composers were an extraordinary find at auction for Dana Jensen, Vender 1, at the Brass Armadillo Antique Mall in Denver.  They measure up to 27 inches tall and weigh as much as 90 lbs.  These sculptures were created by sculptor & pianist Wee Wuone Park, a Korean student at the University of Wyoming, and unveiled at a classical music concert in 1959.  Along with the original sculptures, Mr. Jensen also purchased hundreds of classical vinyl records.  Taped to the front of one of the record sleeves was a program of the concert with a photograph of Wee Park sitting at his piano and three of the four busts in the background.  Inside the sleeve was an LP record of that concert/unveiling in 1959.  In reviewing the program, Mr. Jensen made a discovery that helped him to realize how extraordinary his find was.   Printed within the program is a dedication by Wee Park to Robert Russin, "Distinguised Sculptor and Inspiring Teacher".  Robert Russin was not only a University of Wyoming professor where he taught Wee Park, but he was also an American sculptor and artist known for a number of public sculptures including the giant bust of Abraham Lincoln located near Laramie, Wyoming.  The bust of Lincoln and Park's busts were created in 1959.  The similarities of the work of teacher and student are remarkable.   The sculpted busts of Rachmaninoff, Bach and Beethoven have now found a resting place on display in what was referred to by another vender as the Denver Brass Armadillo's very own "Culture Corner".  This "Culture Corner" comes complete with beautiful display boxes created by the General Manager, Scott Gottula, and the music of the composers playing in the background.    The Beethoven bust, originally sculpted with terra-cotta clay, has been cast in bronze by the world famous foundry, Broze Services Inc., in Loveland, Colorado.  Rachmaninoff, Bach and Brahms have not yet been cast.  The Beethoven bronze is currently for sale.  For more information on this piece or for future castings of the other three originals, please contact Dana Jensen at 720-878-2893 or the Brass Armadillo Antique Mall in Denver at 1-877-403-1677. 
    18194 Posted by Amie Martin
  • Large sculptures of four famous composers were an extraordinary find at auction for Dana Jensen, Vender 1, at the Brass Armadillo Antique Mall in Denver.  They measure up to 27 inches tall and weigh as much as 90 lbs.  These sculptures were created by sculptor & pianist Wee Wuone Park, a Korean student at the University of Wyoming, and unveiled at a classical music concert in 1959.  Along with the original sculptures, Mr. Jensen also purchased hundreds of classical vinyl records.  Taped to the front of one of the record sleeves was a program of the concert with a photograph of Wee Park sitting at his piano and three of the four busts in the background.  Inside the sleeve was an LP record of that concert/unveiling in 1959.  In reviewing the program, Mr. Jensen made a discovery that helped him to realize how extraordinary his find was.   Printed within the program is a dedication by Wee Park to Robert Russin, "Distinguised Sculptor and Inspiring Teacher".  Robert Russin was not only a University of Wyoming professor where he taught Wee Park, but he was also an American sculptor and artist known for a number of public sculptures including the giant bust of Abraham Lincoln located near Laramie, Wyoming.  The bust of Lincoln and Park's busts were created in 1959.  The similarities of the work of teacher and student are remarkable.   The sculpted busts of Rachmaninoff, Bach and Beethoven have now found a resting place on display in what was referred to by another vender as the Denver Brass Armadillo's very own "Culture Corner".  This "Culture Corner" comes complete with beautiful display boxes created by the General Manager, Scott Gottula, and the music of the composers playing in the background.    The Beethoven bust, originally sculpted with terra-cotta clay, has been cast in bronze by the world famous foundry, Broze Services Inc., in Loveland, Colorado.  Rachmaninoff, Bach and Brahms have not yet been cast.  The Beethoven bronze is currently for sale.  For more information on this piece or for future castings of the other three originals, please contact Dana Jensen at 720-878-2893 or the Brass Armadillo Antique Mall in Denver at 1-877-403-1677. 
    Aug 31, 2011 18194
  • 28 Jan 2011
    Check out this link for all the fabulous information! I have been to this sale/show several times and it hits it out of the park everytime! http://www.catspajamasproductions.net/ When you get to the site click on UPCOMING SHOWS to see all the details! Perhaps I will see you there.  
    16510 Posted by Machelle Bryan
  • Check out this link for all the fabulous information! I have been to this sale/show several times and it hits it out of the park everytime! http://www.catspajamasproductions.net/ When you get to the site click on UPCOMING SHOWS to see all the details! Perhaps I will see you there.  
    Jan 28, 2011 16510