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Recent Classifieds

  • Wildlife Lithogragh by James Meger

    325B138D-0665-4421-9490-6D0CE64E3A27.jpeg Description:
    Howling Wolf Wildlife Winter Landscape by James A. Meger, signed lithograph. Numbered 189 out of 2842. Listed for $229.95. Located at Brass Armadilo Antique Mall, Booth 25, Dealer #376. Shipping available for additional fee. Please call for a Shipping quote and to confirm availability (816) 847-5260. 

    September 21, 2018 9:42 AM CDT
  • Antique Silverplate Teapot

    IMG_6718.JPG Description:
    Vendor 528<br />Silverplate Antique Teapot, James Dixon & Sons<br />Made 1851-1879<br /><br />Booth 100

    September 20, 2018 4:12 PM CDT
  • Mirror

    IMG_6715.JPG Description:
    Vendor 820<br />Booth 214

    September 20, 2018 4:10 PM CDT
  • Vintage Rose Rocking Chair

    IMG_6711.JPG Description:
    Vendor 818<br />SKU 918-073<br />Booth 186

    September 20, 2018 4:09 PM CDT
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New Blogs

  • 19 Sep 2018
    We all like certainty, and we expect to know what something is when we buy it. If we don't, then at least we expect to be able to find out what it is after we've researched it. What happens, however, if, after research, we still don't know exactly what we've got, but it's in our inventory, and we've got to sell it? Pretend it's what we hoped it would be?? Don't describe it, and hope that someone else will believe that it's what we hoped it would be?? Price it at what we paid for it, and hope for the best?? Sometimes it really is impossible to be certain. In this show I'll describe a few pieces I acquired and never really was able to find out what I had.
    5 Posted by Gary & Carol Stover
  • We all like certainty, and we expect to know what something is when we buy it. If we don't, then at least we expect to be able to find out what it is after we've researched it. What happens, however, if, after research, we still don't know exactly what we've got, but it's in our inventory, and we've got to sell it? Pretend it's what we hoped it would be?? Don't describe it, and hope that someone else will believe that it's what we hoped it would be?? Price it at what we paid for it, and hope for the best?? Sometimes it really is impossible to be certain. In this show I'll describe a few pieces I acquired and never really was able to find out what I had.
    Sep 19, 2018 5
  • 12 Sep 2018
    A couple of months ago I did a show entitled, "Deciding Which Projects to Take On." The idea is that it is sometimes difficult to determine in advance whether to take the time and make the effort to take on the sale of an entire collection, especially when the category is not one you specialize in. I was confronted with the dilema of deciding whether to invest hours, weeks, months? in buying then selling a collection of aerospace materials originating with the Glenn L. Martin Company in the early '60's (they developed the Titan missles), and/or buying then selling a collection of antique masks and other primarily Asian vintage and antique items. In the end I turned down the aerospace items, but took on the Asian items. In this follow up show I'll show you what pieces I acquired and how I've priced them.
    24 Posted by Gary & Carol Stover
  • A couple of months ago I did a show entitled, "Deciding Which Projects to Take On." The idea is that it is sometimes difficult to determine in advance whether to take the time and make the effort to take on the sale of an entire collection, especially when the category is not one you specialize in. I was confronted with the dilema of deciding whether to invest hours, weeks, months? in buying then selling a collection of aerospace materials originating with the Glenn L. Martin Company in the early '60's (they developed the Titan missles), and/or buying then selling a collection of antique masks and other primarily Asian vintage and antique items. In the end I turned down the aerospace items, but took on the Asian items. In this follow up show I'll show you what pieces I acquired and how I've priced them.
    Sep 12, 2018 24
  • 06 Sep 2018
    I really didn't know how to title this show. What I'm trying to do in this video is compare prices for living artists vs dead artists, gallery prices vs mall prices, prints vs original works of art, and pretty much everything else that goes into determining value for paintings. To demonstrate the variables I chose 4 works of art, all with Native American or Western themes, and all belonging to the same vendor (not me). So, I discuss a serigraph by Bruce King, an acrylic by Bruce King, a serigraph by Earl Biss, and an oil on canvas by Maria Sharylen. Please let me know what you think. Thanks.
    57 Posted by Gary & Carol Stover
  • I really didn't know how to title this show. What I'm trying to do in this video is compare prices for living artists vs dead artists, gallery prices vs mall prices, prints vs original works of art, and pretty much everything else that goes into determining value for paintings. To demonstrate the variables I chose 4 works of art, all with Native American or Western themes, and all belonging to the same vendor (not me). So, I discuss a serigraph by Bruce King, an acrylic by Bruce King, a serigraph by Earl Biss, and an oil on canvas by Maria Sharylen. Please let me know what you think. Thanks.
    Sep 06, 2018 57
  • 29 Aug 2018
    This week's show profiles antique & vintage enamelware in all its various forms, including graniteware. For all its defects, most notably rusting, these colorful kitchen items have remained popular through the years. They were uniformly inexpensive when retailed initiallly through stores like Sears, but now certain features can add value as they've become collectibles. Please let me know if you find these pieces attractive.
    60 Posted by Gary & Carol Stover
  • This week's show profiles antique & vintage enamelware in all its various forms, including graniteware. For all its defects, most notably rusting, these colorful kitchen items have remained popular through the years. They were uniformly inexpensive when retailed initiallly through stores like Sears, but now certain features can add value as they've become collectibles. Please let me know if you find these pieces attractive.
    Aug 29, 2018 60
  • 25 Aug 2018
    Vintage wire ware has been collected for decades. Now it seems there is a resurgence of interest as collectors of wire ware appears to be increasing. Wire tells the story of America and how it shaped the lives of people from cities to across the plains. At the end of the 19th Century, open-range cattle ranching came to an end with the invention of the railroad and the demand for barbed wire fencing was of great importance to farmers in safeguarding farm animals as well as marking the division of land. Just as fencing was important to the rancher, kitchen utensils were important to the way people carried out their daily lives. Collectors are looking for primitive wire baskets, wire egg carriers, milk bottle carriers with wire coil handles, and on and on. A not often seen item is a primitive pie cooling rack holder . Now that would be an awesome find.  A good starting point for your collection could be vintage “Ball” fruit jars with wire bail handles which are less expensive and easier to find.  Primitive wire baskets and lots of kitchen utensils would look great displayed in your kitchen. These collectibles are great reminders that back in the day life was a great deal harder than it is today. They’re great reminders too of how our ancestors lived. Americana at its finest!    
    51 Posted by Betty Jean Shearin
  • Vintage wire ware has been collected for decades. Now it seems there is a resurgence of interest as collectors of wire ware appears to be increasing. Wire tells the story of America and how it shaped the lives of people from cities to across the plains. At the end of the 19th Century, open-range cattle ranching came to an end with the invention of the railroad and the demand for barbed wire fencing was of great importance to farmers in safeguarding farm animals as well as marking the division of land. Just as fencing was important to the rancher, kitchen utensils were important to the way people carried out their daily lives. Collectors are looking for primitive wire baskets, wire egg carriers, milk bottle carriers with wire coil handles, and on and on. A not often seen item is a primitive pie cooling rack holder . Now that would be an awesome find.  A good starting point for your collection could be vintage “Ball” fruit jars with wire bail handles which are less expensive and easier to find.  Primitive wire baskets and lots of kitchen utensils would look great displayed in your kitchen. These collectibles are great reminders that back in the day life was a great deal harder than it is today. They’re great reminders too of how our ancestors lived. Americana at its finest!    
    Aug 25, 2018 51
  • 21 Aug 2018
    Many vintage posters from the 1960's & '70's have increased in value as younger collectors have joined the collectors who grew up in that era. In this week's show I'll profile 2 outstanding collections of vintage posters that are now out for sale at the Brass Armadillo Antique Mall in Denver. One of those collections features San Francisco rock posters from the Avalon Ballroom and the other has posters designed by Gene Hoffman for various advertisers, including skiing venues, the Denver Broncos, and others. Let me know which ones you like.
    86 Posted by Gary & Carol Stover
  • Many vintage posters from the 1960's & '70's have increased in value as younger collectors have joined the collectors who grew up in that era. In this week's show I'll profile 2 outstanding collections of vintage posters that are now out for sale at the Brass Armadillo Antique Mall in Denver. One of those collections features San Francisco rock posters from the Avalon Ballroom and the other has posters designed by Gene Hoffman for various advertisers, including skiing venues, the Denver Broncos, and others. Let me know which ones you like.
    Aug 21, 2018 86